A critical discourse on tacit knowledge management and the performative agenda: Implications for industry training and development

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: This paper examines the relationship between the tacit knowledge held by learning and development professionals and performance measurement regimes of post-modern organisations.

Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on Polanyi’s (1958; 1968) influential ideas about tacit knowledge and Lyotard’s (1984) theory of performativity with regard to criteria such as profit-performance, it assesses the applicability and relevance of tacit, working knowledge in the internet age to the daily working lives of industry training and development personnel. A central question for the study is whether such professionals can still tap into and use their tacit know-how without having it reduced by contemporary performance-oriented regimes of “knowledge”.

Findings: It is argued that there is a powerful interaction between tacit knowledge and narratively produced performance regimes – which are now supported by digital-age technologies including developments in artificial intelligence (AI). It has also been argued that fostering organisational environments that encourage open communication and allow a role for critique remains vital.

Research limitations/implications: With systems of knowledge production including AI at the point of potentially overriding human decision-making processes, more research is required into possible implications of uploading workers’ tacit, working knowledge in different contexts and ways to foster open communication and critique in organisations.

Originality/value: The overt linking of classic theories – Polanyi and Lyotard –and applying these to contemporary (digital-age) training and development contexts is original.

LanguageEnglish
Number of pages17
JournalEuropean Journal of Training and Development
Early online date15 May 2018
DOIs
StateE-pub ahead of print - 15 May 2018

Fingerprint

Knowledge management
Training and development
Tacit knowledge
Industry
Agenda
Discourse
Communication
Artificial intelligence
Decision-making process
Knowledge production
Personnel
Design methodology
Organizational environment
Interaction
Technology development
Workers
Performativity
Professional development
Performance measurement
Profit

Cite this

@article{1dd3ce8524574944846283f5ace264eb,
title = "A critical discourse on tacit knowledge management and the performative agenda: Implications for industry training and development",
abstract = "Purpose: This paper examines the relationship between the tacit knowledge held by learning and development professionals and performance measurement regimes of post-modern organisations.Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on Polanyi’s (1958; 1968) influential ideas about tacit knowledge and Lyotard’s (1984) theory of performativity with regard to criteria such as profit-performance, it assesses the applicability and relevance of tacit, working knowledge in the internet age to the daily working lives of industry training and development personnel. A central question for the study is whether such professionals can still tap into and use their tacit know-how without having it reduced by contemporary performance-oriented regimes of “knowledge”.Findings: It is argued that there is a powerful interaction between tacit knowledge and narratively produced performance regimes – which are now supported by digital-age technologies including developments in artificial intelligence (AI). It has also been argued that fostering organisational environments that encourage open communication and allow a role for critique remains vital.Research limitations/implications: With systems of knowledge production including AI at the point of potentially overriding human decision-making processes, more research is required into possible implications of uploading workers’ tacit, working knowledge in different contexts and ways to foster open communication and critique in organisations.Originality/value: The overt linking of classic theories – Polanyi and Lyotard –and applying these to contemporary (digital-age) training and development contexts is original.",
author = "John Garrick",
year = "2018",
month = "5",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1108/EJTD-12-2017-0107",
language = "English",
journal = "European Journal of Training and Development",
issn = "0309-0590",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - A critical discourse on tacit knowledge management and the performative agenda

T2 - European Journal of Training and Development

AU - Garrick,John

PY - 2018/5/15

Y1 - 2018/5/15

N2 - Purpose: This paper examines the relationship between the tacit knowledge held by learning and development professionals and performance measurement regimes of post-modern organisations.Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on Polanyi’s (1958; 1968) influential ideas about tacit knowledge and Lyotard’s (1984) theory of performativity with regard to criteria such as profit-performance, it assesses the applicability and relevance of tacit, working knowledge in the internet age to the daily working lives of industry training and development personnel. A central question for the study is whether such professionals can still tap into and use their tacit know-how without having it reduced by contemporary performance-oriented regimes of “knowledge”.Findings: It is argued that there is a powerful interaction between tacit knowledge and narratively produced performance regimes – which are now supported by digital-age technologies including developments in artificial intelligence (AI). It has also been argued that fostering organisational environments that encourage open communication and allow a role for critique remains vital.Research limitations/implications: With systems of knowledge production including AI at the point of potentially overriding human decision-making processes, more research is required into possible implications of uploading workers’ tacit, working knowledge in different contexts and ways to foster open communication and critique in organisations.Originality/value: The overt linking of classic theories – Polanyi and Lyotard –and applying these to contemporary (digital-age) training and development contexts is original.

AB - Purpose: This paper examines the relationship between the tacit knowledge held by learning and development professionals and performance measurement regimes of post-modern organisations.Design/methodology/approach: Drawing on Polanyi’s (1958; 1968) influential ideas about tacit knowledge and Lyotard’s (1984) theory of performativity with regard to criteria such as profit-performance, it assesses the applicability and relevance of tacit, working knowledge in the internet age to the daily working lives of industry training and development personnel. A central question for the study is whether such professionals can still tap into and use their tacit know-how without having it reduced by contemporary performance-oriented regimes of “knowledge”.Findings: It is argued that there is a powerful interaction between tacit knowledge and narratively produced performance regimes – which are now supported by digital-age technologies including developments in artificial intelligence (AI). It has also been argued that fostering organisational environments that encourage open communication and allow a role for critique remains vital.Research limitations/implications: With systems of knowledge production including AI at the point of potentially overriding human decision-making processes, more research is required into possible implications of uploading workers’ tacit, working knowledge in different contexts and ways to foster open communication and critique in organisations.Originality/value: The overt linking of classic theories – Polanyi and Lyotard –and applying these to contemporary (digital-age) training and development contexts is original.

U2 - 10.1108/EJTD-12-2017-0107

DO - 10.1108/EJTD-12-2017-0107

M3 - Article

JO - European Journal of Training and Development

JF - European Journal of Training and Development

SN - 0309-0590

ER -