A cross-sectional analysis of the association between night-only or rotating shift work and overweight/obesity among female nurses and midwives

Isabella Zhao, Fiona Bogossian, Catherine Turner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To examine the associations between shift work types and overweight/obesity among female nurses and midwives.

Methods: A cross-sectional study. Measurement included exposure variables: rotating shift work and night-only shift work; outcome variables: overweight and obesity; and potential confounding and associated variables: modifiable lifestyle factors, general health status, menopausal status, and work pattern.

Results: Among the 2086 participants, almost 60% were overweight/obese (31.7% overweight; 27.1% obese). After we adjusted the selected confounders, we found that rotating shift workers were 1.02 times more likely to be overweight/obese than day workers (P = 0.007; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 1.004 to 1.03; and P = 0.02; 95% CI: 1.004 to 1.04, respectively). Night-only shift work was found to be significantly associated with obesity only (P = 0.031; relative risk, 1.02; 95% CI, 1.002 to 1.04).

Conclusions: Rotating shift work was associated with both overweight and obesity; and night-only shift work was associated with obesity, not overweight.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)834-840
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine
Volume54
Issue number7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Nurse Midwives
Obesity
Cross-Sectional Studies
Confidence Intervals
Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
Health Status
Life Style

Cite this

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title = "A cross-sectional analysis of the association between night-only or rotating shift work and overweight/obesity among female nurses and midwives",
abstract = "Objective: To examine the associations between shift work types and overweight/obesity among female nurses and midwives.Methods: A cross-sectional study. Measurement included exposure variables: rotating shift work and night-only shift work; outcome variables: overweight and obesity; and potential confounding and associated variables: modifiable lifestyle factors, general health status, menopausal status, and work pattern.Results: Among the 2086 participants, almost 60{\%} were overweight/obese (31.7{\%} overweight; 27.1{\%} obese). After we adjusted the selected confounders, we found that rotating shift workers were 1.02 times more likely to be overweight/obese than day workers (P = 0.007; 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI], 1.004 to 1.03; and P = 0.02; 95{\%} CI: 1.004 to 1.04, respectively). Night-only shift work was found to be significantly associated with obesity only (P = 0.031; relative risk, 1.02; 95{\%} CI, 1.002 to 1.04).Conclusions: Rotating shift work was associated with both overweight and obesity; and night-only shift work was associated with obesity, not overweight.",
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A cross-sectional analysis of the association between night-only or rotating shift work and overweight/obesity among female nurses and midwives. / Zhao, Isabella; Bogossian, Fiona; Turner, Catherine.

In: Journal of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Vol. 54, No. 7, 07.2012, p. 834-840.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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