A glimpse of the future nursing workforce

The graduate e-cohort study

Annette Huntington, Susan Kellett, Jean Gilmour, Catherine Turner, Stephen Neville

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: This paper outlines the demographic profile, workforce trajectory and study intentions of the first cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses participating in the Graduate e-cohort Study. 

Design: A longitudinal, electronic cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses was recruited into the first survey and completed the questionnaire by logging on to the e-cohort web platform www.e-cohort.net 

Subjects: Newly graduated and registered nurses completing in 2008 from the University of Queensland, Australia; and Massey University, the University of Auckland and AUT University from New Zealand. 

Main outcome measure: The establishment and report on a cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses in Australia and New Zealand. 

Results: All NZ and most Australian participants were employed as nurses. Over half the NZ participants were undertaking a postgraduate qualification compared to 5.9% of the Australian participants. The majority intended to undertake further postgraduate study. All Australian participants working as nurses were currently employed in Australia, 13% of NZ participants were working in Australia. Most participants worked in metropolitan areas (85%) in acute care hospitals (81.1%) in their preferred clinical speciality area (79.4%). Surgical was the most prevalent speciality area (17.8%). 

Conclusions: The majority of participants are young, highly mobile, have completed a graduate transition to practice and work in metropolitan areas. Retention of this workforce is essential to meet health care demands and replace the large cohort of older nurses retiring over the next decade.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)22-29
Number of pages8
JournalAustralian Journal of Advanced Nursing
Volume29
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - May 2012
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nursing
Cohort Studies
Nurses
New Zealand
Queensland
Demography
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Delivery of Health Care

Cite this

Huntington, A., Kellett, S., Gilmour, J., Turner, C., & Neville, S. (2012). A glimpse of the future nursing workforce: The graduate e-cohort study. Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, 29(3), 22-29.
Huntington, Annette ; Kellett, Susan ; Gilmour, Jean ; Turner, Catherine ; Neville, Stephen. / A glimpse of the future nursing workforce : The graduate e-cohort study. In: Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing. 2012 ; Vol. 29, No. 3. pp. 22-29.
@article{f59041d770c04123b299808975c1b47d,
title = "A glimpse of the future nursing workforce: The graduate e-cohort study",
abstract = "Objective: This paper outlines the demographic profile, workforce trajectory and study intentions of the first cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses participating in the Graduate e-cohort Study. Design: A longitudinal, electronic cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses was recruited into the first survey and completed the questionnaire by logging on to the e-cohort web platform www.e-cohort.net Subjects: Newly graduated and registered nurses completing in 2008 from the University of Queensland, Australia; and Massey University, the University of Auckland and AUT University from New Zealand. Main outcome measure: The establishment and report on a cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses in Australia and New Zealand. Results: All NZ and most Australian participants were employed as nurses. Over half the NZ participants were undertaking a postgraduate qualification compared to 5.9{\%} of the Australian participants. The majority intended to undertake further postgraduate study. All Australian participants working as nurses were currently employed in Australia, 13{\%} of NZ participants were working in Australia. Most participants worked in metropolitan areas (85{\%}) in acute care hospitals (81.1{\%}) in their preferred clinical speciality area (79.4{\%}). Surgical was the most prevalent speciality area (17.8{\%}). Conclusions: The majority of participants are young, highly mobile, have completed a graduate transition to practice and work in metropolitan areas. Retention of this workforce is essential to meet health care demands and replace the large cohort of older nurses retiring over the next decade.",
keywords = "Graduate nurses, Internet research, Longitudinal research, Nursing workforce, Retention",
author = "Annette Huntington and Susan Kellett and Jean Gilmour and Catherine Turner and Stephen Neville",
year = "2012",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "29",
pages = "22--29",
journal = "Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing",
issn = "0813-0531",
publisher = "Australian Nursing Federation",
number = "3",

}

Huntington, A, Kellett, S, Gilmour, J, Turner, C & Neville, S 2012, 'A glimpse of the future nursing workforce: The graduate e-cohort study', Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, vol. 29, no. 3, pp. 22-29.

A glimpse of the future nursing workforce : The graduate e-cohort study. / Huntington, Annette; Kellett, Susan; Gilmour, Jean; Turner, Catherine; Neville, Stephen.

In: Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing, Vol. 29, No. 3, 05.2012, p. 22-29.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - A glimpse of the future nursing workforce

T2 - The graduate e-cohort study

AU - Huntington, Annette

AU - Kellett, Susan

AU - Gilmour, Jean

AU - Turner, Catherine

AU - Neville, Stephen

PY - 2012/5

Y1 - 2012/5

N2 - Objective: This paper outlines the demographic profile, workforce trajectory and study intentions of the first cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses participating in the Graduate e-cohort Study. Design: A longitudinal, electronic cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses was recruited into the first survey and completed the questionnaire by logging on to the e-cohort web platform www.e-cohort.net Subjects: Newly graduated and registered nurses completing in 2008 from the University of Queensland, Australia; and Massey University, the University of Auckland and AUT University from New Zealand. Main outcome measure: The establishment and report on a cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses in Australia and New Zealand. Results: All NZ and most Australian participants were employed as nurses. Over half the NZ participants were undertaking a postgraduate qualification compared to 5.9% of the Australian participants. The majority intended to undertake further postgraduate study. All Australian participants working as nurses were currently employed in Australia, 13% of NZ participants were working in Australia. Most participants worked in metropolitan areas (85%) in acute care hospitals (81.1%) in their preferred clinical speciality area (79.4%). Surgical was the most prevalent speciality area (17.8%). Conclusions: The majority of participants are young, highly mobile, have completed a graduate transition to practice and work in metropolitan areas. Retention of this workforce is essential to meet health care demands and replace the large cohort of older nurses retiring over the next decade.

AB - Objective: This paper outlines the demographic profile, workforce trajectory and study intentions of the first cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses participating in the Graduate e-cohort Study. Design: A longitudinal, electronic cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses was recruited into the first survey and completed the questionnaire by logging on to the e-cohort web platform www.e-cohort.net Subjects: Newly graduated and registered nurses completing in 2008 from the University of Queensland, Australia; and Massey University, the University of Auckland and AUT University from New Zealand. Main outcome measure: The establishment and report on a cohort of newly graduated and registered nurses in Australia and New Zealand. Results: All NZ and most Australian participants were employed as nurses. Over half the NZ participants were undertaking a postgraduate qualification compared to 5.9% of the Australian participants. The majority intended to undertake further postgraduate study. All Australian participants working as nurses were currently employed in Australia, 13% of NZ participants were working in Australia. Most participants worked in metropolitan areas (85%) in acute care hospitals (81.1%) in their preferred clinical speciality area (79.4%). Surgical was the most prevalent speciality area (17.8%). Conclusions: The majority of participants are young, highly mobile, have completed a graduate transition to practice and work in metropolitan areas. Retention of this workforce is essential to meet health care demands and replace the large cohort of older nurses retiring over the next decade.

KW - Graduate nurses

KW - Internet research

KW - Longitudinal research

KW - Nursing workforce

KW - Retention

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84859837722&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.ajan.com.au/ajan_29.3.html

M3 - Article

VL - 29

SP - 22

EP - 29

JO - Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing

JF - Australian Journal of Advanced Nursing

SN - 0813-0531

IS - 3

ER -