A novel multiple-stage antimalarial agent that inhibits protein synthesis

Beatriz Baragaña, Irene Hallyburton, Marcus C S Lee, Neil R. Norcross, Raffaella Grimaldi, Thomas D. Otto, William R. Proto, Andrew M. Blagborough, Stephan Meister, Grennady Wirjanata, Andrea Ruecker, Leanna M. Upton, Tara S. Abraham, Mariana J. Almeida, Anupam Pradhan, Achim Porzelle, María Santos Martínez, Judith M. Bolscher, Andrew Woodland, Suzanne NorvalFabio Zuccotto, John Thomas, Frederick Simeons, Laste Stojanovski, Maria Osuna-Cabello, Paddy M. Brock, Tom S. Churcher, Katarzyna A. Sala, Sara E. Zakutansky, María Belén Jiménez-Díaz, Laura Maria Sanz, Jennifer Riley, Rajshekhar Basak, Michael Campbell, Vicky M. Avery, Robert W. Sauerwein, Koen J. Dechering, Rintis Noviyanti, Brice Campo, Julie A. Frearson, Iñigo Angulo-Barturen, Santiago Ferrer-Bazaga, Francisco Javier Gamo, Paul G. Wyatt, Didier Leroy, Peter Siegl, Michael J. Delves, Dennis E. Kyle, Sergio Wittlin, Jutta Marfurt, Ric N. Price, Robert E. Sinden, Elizabeth A. Winzeler, Susan A. Charman, Lidiya Bebrevska, David W. Gray, Simon Campbell, Alan H. Fairlamb, Paul A. Willis, Julian C. Rayner, David A. Fidock, Kevin D. Read, Ian H. Gilbert

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    There is an urgent need for new drugs to treat malaria, with broad therapeutic potential and novel modes of action, to widen the scope of treatment and to overcome emerging drug resistance. Here we describe the discovery of DDD107498, a compound with a potent and novel spectrum of antimalarial activity against multiple life-cycle stages of the Plasmodium parasite, with good pharmacokinetic properties and an acceptable safety profile. DDD107498 demonstrates potential to address a variety of clinical needs, including single-dose treatment, transmission blocking and chemoprotection. DDD107498 was developed from a screening programme against blood-stage malaria parasites; its molecular target has been identified as translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2), which is responsible for the GTP-dependent translocation of the ribosome along messenger RNA, and is essential for protein synthesis. This discovery of eEF2 as a viable antimalarial drug target opens up new possibilities for drug discovery.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)315-320
    Number of pages6
    JournalNature
    Volume22
    Issue number7556
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2015

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