A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors: Effects on sedentary behavior

Tania Patrao, Bridge Lynch, Kerry Courneya, Parneet Sethi, Anna Hawkes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior may independently contribute to morbidity and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention had an effect on the sedentary behavior of recently diagnosed colorectal cancer survivors.

    METHODS:
    A total of 410 participants were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and randomized to the health coaching (intervention) or usual-care (control) group. Eleven health coaching sessions addressing multiple health behaviors, including sedentary behavior, were delivered over a period of 6 months. BACKGROUND: Data were collected at baseline (before randomization), at 6 months, and at 12 months via a telephone interview.

    RESULTS: At 12 months, there was a significant decrease noted in the hours per day of sedentary time in both the health coaching (-1.21; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -1.71 to -0.70) and usual-care groups (-0.55; 95% CI, -1.06 to -0.05), but the between-group difference was not found to be statistically significant (-0.65; 95% CI, -1.37 to 0.06 [P=.07]). In stratified subgroup analyses, the multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have a significant effect on total sedentary time (hours/day) at 12 months in survivors of colorectal cancer who were aged>60 years (-0.90; 95% CI, -1.80 to -0.01 [P=.05]), male (-1.33; 95% CI, -2.44 to -0.21 [P=.02]), and nonobese (-1.10; 95% CI, -1.96 to -0.25; [P=.01]).

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Incorporating simple messages about limiting sedentary behaviors into a multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have modest effects on sedentary behavior. A sedentary behavior-specific intervention strategy may be required to achieve substantial changes in sedentary behavior among colorectal cancer survivors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2665-2672
    Number of pages8
    JournalCancer
    Volume120
    Issue number17
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

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