A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors

Effects on sedentary behavior

Tania Patrao, Bridge Lynch, Kerry Courneya, Parneet Sethi, Anna Hawkes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior may independently contribute to morbidity and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention had an effect on the sedentary behavior of recently diagnosed colorectal cancer survivors.

    METHODS:
    A total of 410 participants were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and randomized to the health coaching (intervention) or usual-care (control) group. Eleven health coaching sessions addressing multiple health behaviors, including sedentary behavior, were delivered over a period of 6 months. BACKGROUND: Data were collected at baseline (before randomization), at 6 months, and at 12 months via a telephone interview.

    RESULTS: At 12 months, there was a significant decrease noted in the hours per day of sedentary time in both the health coaching (-1.21; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -1.71 to -0.70) and usual-care groups (-0.55; 95% CI, -1.06 to -0.05), but the between-group difference was not found to be statistically significant (-0.65; 95% CI, -1.37 to 0.06 [P=.07]). In stratified subgroup analyses, the multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have a significant effect on total sedentary time (hours/day) at 12 months in survivors of colorectal cancer who were aged>60 years (-0.90; 95% CI, -1.80 to -0.01 [P=.05]), male (-1.33; 95% CI, -2.44 to -0.21 [P=.02]), and nonobese (-1.10; 95% CI, -1.96 to -0.25; [P=.01]).

    CONCLUSIONS:
    Incorporating simple messages about limiting sedentary behaviors into a multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have modest effects on sedentary behavior. A sedentary behavior-specific intervention strategy may be required to achieve substantial changes in sedentary behavior among colorectal cancer survivors.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)2665-2672
    Number of pages8
    JournalCancer
    Volume120
    Issue number17
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2014

    Fingerprint

    Health Behavior
    Survivors
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Randomized Controlled Trials
    Confidence Intervals
    Health
    Queensland
    Random Allocation
    Telephone
    Registries
    Interviews
    Morbidity
    Control Groups
    Mortality
    Mentoring
    Neoplasms

    Cite this

    Patrao, Tania ; Lynch, Bridge ; Courneya, Kerry ; Sethi, Parneet ; Hawkes, Anna. / A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors : Effects on sedentary behavior. In: Cancer. 2014 ; Vol. 120, No. 17. pp. 2665-2672.
    @article{dd9b30a25324433a8e5862d193e990b6,
    title = "A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors: Effects on sedentary behavior",
    abstract = "BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior may independently contribute to morbidity and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention had an effect on the sedentary behavior of recently diagnosed colorectal cancer survivors. METHODS: A total of 410 participants were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and randomized to the health coaching (intervention) or usual-care (control) group. Eleven health coaching sessions addressing multiple health behaviors, including sedentary behavior, were delivered over a period of 6 months. BACKGROUND: Data were collected at baseline (before randomization), at 6 months, and at 12 months via a telephone interview. RESULTS: At 12 months, there was a significant decrease noted in the hours per day of sedentary time in both the health coaching (-1.21; 95{\%} confidence interval [95{\%} CI], -1.71 to -0.70) and usual-care groups (-0.55; 95{\%} CI, -1.06 to -0.05), but the between-group difference was not found to be statistically significant (-0.65; 95{\%} CI, -1.37 to 0.06 [P=.07]). In stratified subgroup analyses, the multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have a significant effect on total sedentary time (hours/day) at 12 months in survivors of colorectal cancer who were aged>60 years (-0.90; 95{\%} CI, -1.80 to -0.01 [P=.05]), male (-1.33; 95{\%} CI, -2.44 to -0.21 [P=.02]), and nonobese (-1.10; 95{\%} CI, -1.96 to -0.25; [P=.01]). CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating simple messages about limiting sedentary behaviors into a multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have modest effects on sedentary behavior. A sedentary behavior-specific intervention strategy may be required to achieve substantial changes in sedentary behavior among colorectal cancer survivors.",
    keywords = "adult, age distribution, article, Australia, cancer registry, cancer survivor, clinical effectiveness, colorectal cancer, comparative study, controlled study, energy expenditure, female, high risk population, human, major clinical study, male, multiple health behavior change intervention, obesity, outcome assessment, parameters, patient care, physical activity, prevalence, priority journal, randomized controlled trial, sedentary lifestyle, sedentary time, self report, sex difference, telemedicine, telephone interview, treatment duration, cancer survivorship, sitting time, television, Aged, Body Mass Index, Colorectal Neoplasms, Delivery of Health Care, Female, Health Behavior, Humans, Male, Middle Aged, Sedentary Lifestyle, Survivors, Telephone",
    author = "Tania Patrao and Bridge Lynch and Kerry Courneya and Parneet Sethi and Anna Hawkes",
    year = "2014",
    doi = "10.1002/cncr.28773",
    language = "English",
    volume = "120",
    pages = "2665--2672",
    journal = "Cancer",
    issn = "0008-543X",
    publisher = "John Wiley & Sons",
    number = "17",

    }

    A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors : Effects on sedentary behavior. / Patrao, Tania; Lynch, Bridge; Courneya, Kerry; Sethi, Parneet; Hawkes, Anna.

    In: Cancer, Vol. 120, No. 17, 2014, p. 2665-2672.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - A randomized controlled trial of a multiple health behavior change intervention delivered to colorectal cancer survivors

    T2 - Effects on sedentary behavior

    AU - Patrao, Tania

    AU - Lynch, Bridge

    AU - Courneya, Kerry

    AU - Sethi, Parneet

    AU - Hawkes, Anna

    PY - 2014

    Y1 - 2014

    N2 - BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior may independently contribute to morbidity and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention had an effect on the sedentary behavior of recently diagnosed colorectal cancer survivors. METHODS: A total of 410 participants were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and randomized to the health coaching (intervention) or usual-care (control) group. Eleven health coaching sessions addressing multiple health behaviors, including sedentary behavior, were delivered over a period of 6 months. BACKGROUND: Data were collected at baseline (before randomization), at 6 months, and at 12 months via a telephone interview. RESULTS: At 12 months, there was a significant decrease noted in the hours per day of sedentary time in both the health coaching (-1.21; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -1.71 to -0.70) and usual-care groups (-0.55; 95% CI, -1.06 to -0.05), but the between-group difference was not found to be statistically significant (-0.65; 95% CI, -1.37 to 0.06 [P=.07]). In stratified subgroup analyses, the multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have a significant effect on total sedentary time (hours/day) at 12 months in survivors of colorectal cancer who were aged>60 years (-0.90; 95% CI, -1.80 to -0.01 [P=.05]), male (-1.33; 95% CI, -2.44 to -0.21 [P=.02]), and nonobese (-1.10; 95% CI, -1.96 to -0.25; [P=.01]). CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating simple messages about limiting sedentary behaviors into a multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have modest effects on sedentary behavior. A sedentary behavior-specific intervention strategy may be required to achieve substantial changes in sedentary behavior among colorectal cancer survivors.

    AB - BACKGROUND: Sedentary behavior may independently contribute to morbidity and mortality among survivors of colorectal cancer. In the current study, the authors assessed whether a telephone-delivered multiple health behavior change intervention had an effect on the sedentary behavior of recently diagnosed colorectal cancer survivors. METHODS: A total of 410 participants were recruited through the Queensland Cancer Registry and randomized to the health coaching (intervention) or usual-care (control) group. Eleven health coaching sessions addressing multiple health behaviors, including sedentary behavior, were delivered over a period of 6 months. BACKGROUND: Data were collected at baseline (before randomization), at 6 months, and at 12 months via a telephone interview. RESULTS: At 12 months, there was a significant decrease noted in the hours per day of sedentary time in both the health coaching (-1.21; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], -1.71 to -0.70) and usual-care groups (-0.55; 95% CI, -1.06 to -0.05), but the between-group difference was not found to be statistically significant (-0.65; 95% CI, -1.37 to 0.06 [P=.07]). In stratified subgroup analyses, the multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have a significant effect on total sedentary time (hours/day) at 12 months in survivors of colorectal cancer who were aged>60 years (-0.90; 95% CI, -1.80 to -0.01 [P=.05]), male (-1.33; 95% CI, -2.44 to -0.21 [P=.02]), and nonobese (-1.10; 95% CI, -1.96 to -0.25; [P=.01]). CONCLUSIONS: Incorporating simple messages about limiting sedentary behaviors into a multiple health behavior change intervention was found to have modest effects on sedentary behavior. A sedentary behavior-specific intervention strategy may be required to achieve substantial changes in sedentary behavior among colorectal cancer survivors.

    KW - adult

    KW - age distribution

    KW - article

    KW - Australia

    KW - cancer registry

    KW - cancer survivor

    KW - clinical effectiveness

    KW - colorectal cancer

    KW - comparative study

    KW - controlled study

    KW - energy expenditure

    KW - female

    KW - high risk population

    KW - human

    KW - major clinical study

    KW - male

    KW - multiple health behavior change intervention

    KW - obesity

    KW - outcome assessment

    KW - parameters

    KW - patient care

    KW - physical activity

    KW - prevalence

    KW - priority journal

    KW - randomized controlled trial

    KW - sedentary lifestyle

    KW - sedentary time

    KW - self report

    KW - sex difference

    KW - telemedicine

    KW - telephone interview

    KW - treatment duration

    KW - cancer survivorship

    KW - sitting time

    KW - television

    KW - Aged

    KW - Body Mass Index

    KW - Colorectal Neoplasms

    KW - Delivery of Health Care

    KW - Female

    KW - Health Behavior

    KW - Humans

    KW - Male

    KW - Middle Aged

    KW - Sedentary Lifestyle

    KW - Survivors

    KW - Telephone

    U2 - 10.1002/cncr.28773

    DO - 10.1002/cncr.28773

    M3 - Article

    VL - 120

    SP - 2665

    EP - 2672

    JO - Cancer

    JF - Cancer

    SN - 0008-543X

    IS - 17

    ER -