A simple antibiotic susceptibility assay for Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii biofilm could lead to effective treatment selection for chronic lung infections

DL Wannigama, C Hurst, L Pearson, T Saethang, U Singkham-In, S Luk-In, RJ Storer, T Chatsuwan

Research output: Contribution to conferenceAbstract

Abstract

PURPOSE: The lung infections by Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Acinetobacter baumannii share a number of clinical similarities, the most striking of which is bacterial persistence via biofilm despite intensified antimicrobial therapy. These infections have been treated using antimicrobial testing on planktonic bacteria and treatment has been directed towards the bacteria found in this manner results in substantial failure against biofilm infections.
METHODS: We offers a robust and simple experimental platform to monitor the impact of antimicrobials against biofilm. We carefully calibrated incubation time, detection range, and fluorescence reading mode for resazurin-based viability staining in 96-well-plates and determine minimal biofilm eradication concentrations (MBECs) for A. baumannii and P. aeruginosa 200 clinical
isolates from a patients with chronic lung infections.
RESULTS: By applying the assay, we could demonstrate that antibiotic response patterns varied uniquely within biofilm formation capacity and clinical samples. Both MBEC-50 and 75 have a significant discriminatory power than MIC to differentiate overall efficiency of antibiotic to eradicate biofilm. In all cases, the accuracy of classifying biofilm structure using an MBEC test was superior to MIC.
CONCLUSIONS: In conclusion, our assay will be simple, cost-effective and ideal platform to unravelling the complex interactions that occur between antibiotic and biofilm under in vitro conditions to pave the way for the better therapy and warrants clinical trials.
CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS: Insights gained through this work may offer a better clinical tool to distinct of biofilm infections, and will dramatically alter the way of patients are treated for chronic lung infections.
Original languageEnglish
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
Externally publishedYes
EventChest Congress 2019 -
Duration: 10 Apr 201912 Apr 2019

Conference

ConferenceChest Congress 2019
Period10/04/1912/04/19

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