A Six-Step Framework on Biomedical Signal Analysis for Tackling Noncommunicable Diseases

Current and Future Perspectives

Mohamed Elgendi, Newton Howard, Nigel H. Lovell, Andrzej Cichocki, Matt Brearley, Derek Abbott, Ian Adatia

    Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticleResearch

    Abstract

    Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) continue to face major challenges in providing high-quality and universally accessible health care. Researchers, policy makers, donors, and program implementers consistently strive to develop and provide innovative approaches to eliminate geographical and financial barriers to health care access. Recently, interest has increased in using mobile health (mHealth) as a potential solution to overcome barriers to improving health care in LMICs. Moreover, with use increasing and cost decreasing for mobile phones and Internet, mHealth solutions are becoming considerably more promising and efficient. As part of mHealth solutions, biomedical signals collection and processing may play a major role in improving global health care. Information extracted from biomedical signals might increase diagnostic precision while augmenting the robustness of health care workers’ clinical decision making. This paper presents a high-level framework using biomedical signal processing (BSP) for tackling diagnosis of noncommunicable diseases, especially in LMICs. Researchers can consider each of these elements during the research and design of BSP-based devices, enabling them to elevate their work to a level that extends beyond the scope of a particular application and use. This paper includes technical examples to emphasize the applicability of the proposed framework, which is relevant to a wide variety of stakeholders, including researchers, policy makers, clinicians, computer scientists, and engineers.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages1-15
    Number of pages15
    Volume1
    No.1
    Specialist publicationJMIR Biomedical Engineering
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2016

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    Signal analysis
    Health care
    Bioelectric potentials
    Mobile phones
    Decision making
    Internet
    Engineers
    Processing
    mHealth
    Costs
    Biomedical signal processing

    Cite this

    Elgendi, Mohamed ; Howard, Newton ; Lovell, Nigel H. ; Cichocki, Andrzej ; Brearley, Matt ; Abbott, Derek ; Adatia, Ian. / A Six-Step Framework on Biomedical Signal Analysis for Tackling Noncommunicable Diseases : Current and Future Perspectives. In: JMIR Biomedical Engineering. 2016 ; Vol. 1, No. 1. pp. 1-15.
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    A Six-Step Framework on Biomedical Signal Analysis for Tackling Noncommunicable Diseases : Current and Future Perspectives. / Elgendi, Mohamed; Howard, Newton; Lovell, Nigel H.; Cichocki, Andrzej; Brearley, Matt; Abbott, Derek; Adatia, Ian.

    In: JMIR Biomedical Engineering, Vol. 1, No. 1, 01.10.2016, p. 1-15.

    Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticleResearch

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