A survey of the views and capabilities of community pharmacists in Western Australia regarding the rescheduling of selected oral antibiotics in a framework of pharmacist prescribing

Fatima Sinkala, Richard Parsons, Bruce Sunderland, Kreshnik Hoti, Petra Czarniak

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Abstract

Background: Antibiotic misuse in the community contributes to antimicrobial resistance. One way to address this may be by better utilizing community pharmacists' skills in antibiotic prescribing. The aims of this study were to examine the level of support for "down-scheduling" selected antibiotics and to evaluate factors determining the appropriateness of community pharmacist prescribing for a limited range of infections, including their decision to refer to a doctor.

Methods: Self-administered questionnaires, including graded case vignette scenarios simulating real practice, were sent to Western Australian community pharmacists. In addition to descriptive statistics and chi-square testing, a General Estimating Equation (GEE) was used to identify factors associated with appropriateness of therapy and the decision to refer, for each of the seven vignettes.

Results: Of the 240 pharmacists surveyed, 90 (37.5%) responded, yielding 630 responses to seven different case vignettes. There was more than 60% respondent support for expanded prescribing (rescheduling) of commonly prescribed antibiotics. Overall 426/630 (67.6%) chose to treat the patient while the remaining 204/630 (32.4%) referred the patient to a doctor. Of those electing to treat, 380/426 (89.2%) opted to use oral antibiotics, with 293/380 (77.2%) treating with an appropriate selection and regimen. The GEE model indicated that pharmacists were more likely to prescribe inappropriately for conditions such as otitis media (p = 0.0060) and urinary tract infection in pregnancy (p < 0:0001) compared to more complex conditions. Over 80% of all pharmacists would refer the patient to a doctor following no improvement within 3 days, or within 24 h in the case of community acquired pneumonia. It was more common for younger pharmacists to refer the patient to a doctor (p=0:0165).

Discussion: This study adds further insight into community pharmacy/pharmacist characteristics associated with appropriateness of oral antibiotic selection and the decision to refer to doctors. These findings require consideration in designing pharmacist over-the-counter prescribing models for oral antibiotics.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere4726
Pages (from-to)1-18
Number of pages18
JournalPEERJ
Volume2018
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 May 2018
Externally publishedYes

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