A telephone-delivered multiple health behaviour change intervention for colorectal cancer survivors

making the case for cost-effective healthcare

L.G Gordon, Tania Patrao, S Kularatna, A.L Hawkes

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    In patients with colorectal cancer, a trial of a telephone-delivered multiple health behaviour change intervention, using acceptance commitment therapy strategies, found benefits for health and psychosocial outcomes including increased physical activity, improved dietary habits and lower body mass index. Our aim was to address the health economic outcomes by assessing the health system cost and health utility impacts of the intervention. A cost-consequences analysis was performed using data from a two-group randomised controlled intervention trial (n = 410). Outcomes included health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health utility and health system costs. At 12 months, clinically meaningful improvements were found for SF-6D over time but no significant differences were found between groups (P = 0.95). The cost of delivering the 6-month intervention was on average €280 per person and made up 21% of overall healthcare costs for participants during the intervention period. Excluding intervention costs, costs were similar for health professional visits and medications across groups. Despite significant positive intervention effects on health behaviours, health utility and HRQoL scores were similar across groups. On the basis that intervention costs were small and physical activity, diet and weight management improved, on balance the intervention is potentially a worthwhile investment in healthcare funds.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)854-861
    Number of pages8
    JournalEuropean Journal of Cancer Care
    Volume24
    Issue number6
    Early online date22 Oct 2015
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 2015

    Fingerprint

    Health Behavior
    Telephone
    Health Care Costs
    Survivors
    Colorectal Neoplasms
    Costs and Cost Analysis
    Health
    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy
    Quality of Life
    Exercise
    Feeding Behavior
    Insurance Benefits
    Financial Management
    Body Mass Index
    Randomized Controlled Trials
    Economics
    Diet
    Delivery of Health Care
    Weights and Measures

    Cite this

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    abstract = "In patients with colorectal cancer, a trial of a telephone-delivered multiple health behaviour change intervention, using acceptance commitment therapy strategies, found benefits for health and psychosocial outcomes including increased physical activity, improved dietary habits and lower body mass index. Our aim was to address the health economic outcomes by assessing the health system cost and health utility impacts of the intervention. A cost-consequences analysis was performed using data from a two-group randomised controlled intervention trial (n = 410). Outcomes included health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health utility and health system costs. At 12 months, clinically meaningful improvements were found for SF-6D over time but no significant differences were found between groups (P = 0.95). The cost of delivering the 6-month intervention was on average €280 per person and made up 21{\%} of overall healthcare costs for participants during the intervention period. Excluding intervention costs, costs were similar for health professional visits and medications across groups. Despite significant positive intervention effects on health behaviours, health utility and HRQoL scores were similar across groups. On the basis that intervention costs were small and physical activity, diet and weight management improved, on balance the intervention is potentially a worthwhile investment in healthcare funds.",
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    A telephone-delivered multiple health behaviour change intervention for colorectal cancer survivors : making the case for cost-effective healthcare. / Gordon, L.G; Patrao, Tania; Kularatna, S; Hawkes, A.L.

    In: European Journal of Cancer Care, Vol. 24, No. 6, 11.2015, p. 854-861.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AB - In patients with colorectal cancer, a trial of a telephone-delivered multiple health behaviour change intervention, using acceptance commitment therapy strategies, found benefits for health and psychosocial outcomes including increased physical activity, improved dietary habits and lower body mass index. Our aim was to address the health economic outcomes by assessing the health system cost and health utility impacts of the intervention. A cost-consequences analysis was performed using data from a two-group randomised controlled intervention trial (n = 410). Outcomes included health-related quality of life (HRQoL), health utility and health system costs. At 12 months, clinically meaningful improvements were found for SF-6D over time but no significant differences were found between groups (P = 0.95). The cost of delivering the 6-month intervention was on average €280 per person and made up 21% of overall healthcare costs for participants during the intervention period. Excluding intervention costs, costs were similar for health professional visits and medications across groups. Despite significant positive intervention effects on health behaviours, health utility and HRQoL scores were similar across groups. On the basis that intervention costs were small and physical activity, diet and weight management improved, on balance the intervention is potentially a worthwhile investment in healthcare funds.

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