Acoustic and Perceptual Profiles of Swallowing Sounds in Children: Normative Data for 4–36 Months from a Cross-Sectional Study Cohort

Thuy T. Frakking, Anne B. Chang, Kerry Ann F O’Grady, Julie Yang, Michael David, Kelly A. Weir

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    Limited data on cervical auscultation (CA) sounds during the transitional feeding period of 4–36 months in healthy children exist. This study examined the acoustic and perceptual parameters of swallowing sounds in children aged 4–36 months over a range of food and fluid consistencies. Using CA, swallowing sounds were recorded from a microphone as children ate or drank. Acoustic parameters of duration, peak frequency and peak intensity were determined. Perceptual parameters of swallowing/breath sounds heard pre-, during and post-swallow were rated (‘present’, ‘absent’, ‘cannot be determined’) for each texture. 74 children (35 males; mean age = 17.1 months [SD 10.0]) demonstrated mean swallow durations of <1 s. Increasing age correlated to reduced peak frequency on puree (r = −0.48, 95 % CI −0.66, −0.24). Age correlated to peak amplitude when swallowing puree (r = 0.27, 95 % CI 0.02, 0.49), chewable solids (r = 0.31, 95 % CI 0.02, 0.56) and thin fluids (r = 0.48, 95 % CI 0.27, 0.64). The bolus transit sound was present in all swallows. A majority of children had normal breathing sounds and coordinated swallows. A swallow duration of <1 s and the presence of a quick bolus transit sound with normal breathing sounds were found in healthy children. The normative data reported in this study provide a platform for future comparison to abnormal swallowing sounds in children.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article number10
    Pages (from-to)261
    Number of pages270
    JournalDysphagia
    Volume32
    Issue number2
    Early online date9 Nov 2016
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

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