Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients

A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials

Tao Wang, Renli Deng, Jing Yu Tan, Feng Guang Guan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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Abstract

This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depression than using standard methods of treatment/care. Four studies compared true acupoints stimulation with sham methods, and no significant differences can be found between groups for either depression or anxiety, although the pooled effects still favored true intervention. For the five studies that evaluated sleep quality, the results were conflicting, with three supporting the superiority of acupoints stimulation in improving sleep quality and two demonstrating no differences across groups. Acupoints stimulation seems to be an effective approach in relieving depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and placebo effects may partially contribute to the benefits. However, the evidence is not conclusive due to the limited number of included studies and the clinical heterogeneity identified among trials. More rigorous designed randomized, sham-controlled studies are necessary in future research.

Original languageEnglish
Article number5645632
Pages (from-to)1-15
Number of pages15
JournalEvidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine
Volume2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jan 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Acupuncture Points
Anxiety
Randomized Controlled Trials
Depression
Neoplasms
Sleep
Placebo Effect
Therapeutic Uses
Therapeutics

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abstract = "This study aims at concluding the current evidence on the therapeutic effects of acupoints stimulation for cancer patients with anxiety and depression. Randomized controlled trials using acupoints stimulation for relieving anxiety and/or depression in cancer patients were searched, and 11 studies were finally included, of which eight trials compared acupoints stimulation with standard methods of treatment/care, and acupoints stimulation showed significantly better effects in improving depression than using standard methods of treatment/care. Four studies compared true acupoints stimulation with sham methods, and no significant differences can be found between groups for either depression or anxiety, although the pooled effects still favored true intervention. For the five studies that evaluated sleep quality, the results were conflicting, with three supporting the superiority of acupoints stimulation in improving sleep quality and two demonstrating no differences across groups. Acupoints stimulation seems to be an effective approach in relieving depression and anxiety in cancer patients, and placebo effects may partially contribute to the benefits. However, the evidence is not conclusive due to the limited number of included studies and the clinical heterogeneity identified among trials. More rigorous designed randomized, sham-controlled studies are necessary in future research.",
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Acupoints Stimulation for Anxiety and Depression in Cancer Patients : A Quantitative Synthesis of Randomized Controlled Trials. / Wang, Tao; Deng, Renli; Tan, Jing Yu; Guan, Feng Guang.

In: Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, Vol. 2016, 5645632, 01.01.2016, p. 1-15.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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