Adaptive Motor Imagery

A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity

Hana Burianova, Paul F. Sowman, Lars Marstaller, Anina N. Rich, Mark A. Williams, Greg Savage, Shahd Al-Janabi, Peter De Lissa, Blake W. Johnson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The consequences of losing the ability to move a limb are traumatic. One approach that examines the impact of pathological limb nonuse on the brain involves temporary immobilization of a healthy limb. Here, we investigated immobilization-induced plasticity in the motor imagery (MI) circuitry during hand immobilization. We assessed these changes with a multimodal paradigm, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural activation, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track neuronal oscillatory dynamics, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal excitability. fMRI results show a significant decrease in neural activation for MI of the constrained hand, localized to sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. MEG results show a significant decrease in beta desynchronization and faster resynchronization in sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. TMS results show a significant increase in resting motor threshold in motor cortex contralateral to the constrained hand, suggesting a decrease in corticospinal excitability in the projections to the constrained hand. These results demonstrate a direct and rapid effect of immobilization on MI processes of the constrained hand, suggesting that limb nonuse may not only affect motor execution, as evidenced by previous studies, but also MI. These findings have important implications for the effectiveness of therapeutic approaches that use MI as a rehabilitation tool to ameliorate the negative effects of limb nonuse.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1072-1080
Number of pages9
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume26
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Imagery (Psychotherapy)
Immobilization
Hand
Extremities
Brain
Magnetoencephalography
Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Aptitude
Motor Cortex
Therapeutic Uses
Rehabilitation

Cite this

Burianova, H., Sowman, P. F., Marstaller, L., Rich, A. N., Williams, M. A., Savage, G., ... Johnson, B. W. (2016). Adaptive Motor Imagery: A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity. Cerebral Cortex, 26(3), 1072-1080. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhu287
Burianova, Hana ; Sowman, Paul F. ; Marstaller, Lars ; Rich, Anina N. ; Williams, Mark A. ; Savage, Greg ; Al-Janabi, Shahd ; De Lissa, Peter ; Johnson, Blake W. / Adaptive Motor Imagery : A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity. In: Cerebral Cortex. 2016 ; Vol. 26, No. 3. pp. 1072-1080.
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Burianova, H, Sowman, PF, Marstaller, L, Rich, AN, Williams, MA, Savage, G, Al-Janabi, S, De Lissa, P & Johnson, BW 2016, 'Adaptive Motor Imagery: A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity', Cerebral Cortex, vol. 26, no. 3, pp. 1072-1080. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhu287

Adaptive Motor Imagery : A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity. / Burianova, Hana; Sowman, Paul F.; Marstaller, Lars; Rich, Anina N.; Williams, Mark A.; Savage, Greg; Al-Janabi, Shahd; De Lissa, Peter; Johnson, Blake W.

In: Cerebral Cortex, Vol. 26, No. 3, 03.2016, p. 1072-1080.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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T1 - Adaptive Motor Imagery

T2 - A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity

AU - Burianova, Hana

AU - Sowman, Paul F.

AU - Marstaller, Lars

AU - Rich, Anina N.

AU - Williams, Mark A.

AU - Savage, Greg

AU - Al-Janabi, Shahd

AU - De Lissa, Peter

AU - Johnson, Blake W.

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N2 - The consequences of losing the ability to move a limb are traumatic. One approach that examines the impact of pathological limb nonuse on the brain involves temporary immobilization of a healthy limb. Here, we investigated immobilization-induced plasticity in the motor imagery (MI) circuitry during hand immobilization. We assessed these changes with a multimodal paradigm, using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to measure neural activation, magnetoencephalography (MEG) to track neuronal oscillatory dynamics, and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) to assess corticospinal excitability. fMRI results show a significant decrease in neural activation for MI of the constrained hand, localized to sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. MEG results show a significant decrease in beta desynchronization and faster resynchronization in sensorimotor areas contralateral to the immobilized hand. TMS results show a significant increase in resting motor threshold in motor cortex contralateral to the constrained hand, suggesting a decrease in corticospinal excitability in the projections to the constrained hand. These results demonstrate a direct and rapid effect of immobilization on MI processes of the constrained hand, suggesting that limb nonuse may not only affect motor execution, as evidenced by previous studies, but also MI. These findings have important implications for the effectiveness of therapeutic approaches that use MI as a rehabilitation tool to ameliorate the negative effects of limb nonuse.

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JO - Cerebral Cortex

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SN - 1047-3211

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Burianova H, Sowman PF, Marstaller L, Rich AN, Williams MA, Savage G et al. Adaptive Motor Imagery: A Multimodal Study of Immobilization-Induced Brain Plasticity. Cerebral Cortex. 2016 Mar;26(3):1072-1080. https://doi.org/10.1093/cercor/bhu287