Adult education and community capacity building: The case of African-Australian women in the Northern Territory

Susana Saffu

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

    Abstract

    The Northern Territory (NT) is the smallest settlement location for
    migrants and refugees in Australia. Over the past decade there has been a
    significant increase in the number of Sub-Saharan African women
    migrants and refugees in the NT. This influx has generated a range of
    government and community responses to build these African migrants
    and refugees’ capacity to integrate into their host community. This article
    is inspired by the author’s personal experience as an African immigrant
    woman and an adult educator, and it is informed by her doctoral study in
    progress with 23 African-Australian migrant and refugee women in the
    NT as participants. The study uses qualitative methods informed by
    feminist perspectives to explore how these women utilize adult education
    techniques to build their capacity to integrate into wider Australian
    society. It examines the underlying reasons why the participants engage
    in adult education, and their experiences of struggles and achievements. It
    reports on preliminary findings which indicate that education is a potent
    force which has enabled the participants to find meaning in the challenges
    of their existence. The stories of the participants attest to empowerment
    and hope, which can inform opportunities and educational pathways
    offered to other migrant and refugee groups in Australia and elsewhere.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)13-36
    Number of pages23
    JournalAustralasian Review of African Studies
    Volume31
    Issue number1
    Publication statusPublished - Jun 2010

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