Advances in understanding the influence of fire on the ecology and evolution of plants

a tribute to Peter J. Clarke

Michael Lawes, David Keith, R Bradstock

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearch

    Abstract

    In this special issue of Plant Ecology celebrating the research contributions of the late Peter J. Clarke, we review advances in understanding of interactions between fire and vegetation, and the role of these interactions in shaping the evolution of plant species. The research presented here reviews the measurement of fire severity and plant responses to it, particularly through resistance traits such as thick bark, and resilience traits such as regenerative organs and fire-cued recruitment. It explores genetic and ecological evidence for evolutionary hypotheses that provide insights into associations among plant traits and the causes of their non-random distribution across fire-prone landscapes. At these larger scales, the advances include new evidence for existence of fire-mediated alternative stable states and improved understanding of how ecological responses to fire might change under future climates. The diversity of subjects and scales of ecological organisation addressed in this collection of papers reflect the breadth and depth of Peter Clarke’s legacy in fire ecology.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)597-605
    Number of pages9
    JournalPlant Ecology
    Volume217
    Issue number6
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2016

    Fingerprint

    ecology
    fire ecology
    fire severity
    plant ecology
    plant response
    bark
    climate
    vegetation

    Cite this

    Lawes, Michael ; Keith, David ; Bradstock, R. / Advances in understanding the influence of fire on the ecology and evolution of plants : a tribute to Peter J. Clarke. In: Plant Ecology. 2016 ; Vol. 217, No. 6. pp. 597-605.
    @article{ccac52bbb3e645f191f55078be0665f7,
    title = "Advances in understanding the influence of fire on the ecology and evolution of plants: a tribute to Peter J. Clarke",
    abstract = "In this special issue of Plant Ecology celebrating the research contributions of the late Peter J. Clarke, we review advances in understanding of interactions between fire and vegetation, and the role of these interactions in shaping the evolution of plant species. The research presented here reviews the measurement of fire severity and plant responses to it, particularly through resistance traits such as thick bark, and resilience traits such as regenerative organs and fire-cued recruitment. It explores genetic and ecological evidence for evolutionary hypotheses that provide insights into associations among plant traits and the causes of their non-random distribution across fire-prone landscapes. At these larger scales, the advances include new evidence for existence of fire-mediated alternative stable states and improved understanding of how ecological responses to fire might change under future climates. The diversity of subjects and scales of ecological organisation addressed in this collection of papers reflect the breadth and depth of Peter Clarke’s legacy in fire ecology.",
    author = "Michael Lawes and David Keith and R Bradstock",
    year = "2016",
    doi = "10.1007/s11258-016-0625-6",
    language = "English",
    volume = "217",
    pages = "597--605",
    journal = "Plant Ecology",
    issn = "0042-3106",
    publisher = "Kluwer Academic Publishers",
    number = "6",

    }

    Advances in understanding the influence of fire on the ecology and evolution of plants : a tribute to Peter J. Clarke. / Lawes, Michael; Keith, David; Bradstock, R.

    In: Plant Ecology, Vol. 217, No. 6, 2016, p. 597-605.

    Research output: Contribution to journalEditorialResearch

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Advances in understanding the influence of fire on the ecology and evolution of plants

    T2 - a tribute to Peter J. Clarke

    AU - Lawes, Michael

    AU - Keith, David

    AU - Bradstock, R

    PY - 2016

    Y1 - 2016

    N2 - In this special issue of Plant Ecology celebrating the research contributions of the late Peter J. Clarke, we review advances in understanding of interactions between fire and vegetation, and the role of these interactions in shaping the evolution of plant species. The research presented here reviews the measurement of fire severity and plant responses to it, particularly through resistance traits such as thick bark, and resilience traits such as regenerative organs and fire-cued recruitment. It explores genetic and ecological evidence for evolutionary hypotheses that provide insights into associations among plant traits and the causes of their non-random distribution across fire-prone landscapes. At these larger scales, the advances include new evidence for existence of fire-mediated alternative stable states and improved understanding of how ecological responses to fire might change under future climates. The diversity of subjects and scales of ecological organisation addressed in this collection of papers reflect the breadth and depth of Peter Clarke’s legacy in fire ecology.

    AB - In this special issue of Plant Ecology celebrating the research contributions of the late Peter J. Clarke, we review advances in understanding of interactions between fire and vegetation, and the role of these interactions in shaping the evolution of plant species. The research presented here reviews the measurement of fire severity and plant responses to it, particularly through resistance traits such as thick bark, and resilience traits such as regenerative organs and fire-cued recruitment. It explores genetic and ecological evidence for evolutionary hypotheses that provide insights into associations among plant traits and the causes of their non-random distribution across fire-prone landscapes. At these larger scales, the advances include new evidence for existence of fire-mediated alternative stable states and improved understanding of how ecological responses to fire might change under future climates. The diversity of subjects and scales of ecological organisation addressed in this collection of papers reflect the breadth and depth of Peter Clarke’s legacy in fire ecology.

    UR - http://10.1007/s11258-016-0625-6

    U2 - 10.1007/s11258-016-0625-6

    DO - 10.1007/s11258-016-0625-6

    M3 - Editorial

    VL - 217

    SP - 597

    EP - 605

    JO - Plant Ecology

    JF - Plant Ecology

    SN - 0042-3106

    IS - 6

    ER -