Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia

M Eriksson, J Olley, D Kilham, T PIETSCH, Robert Wasson

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Past phases of aggradation and incision have been studied along a 10 km reach in the Naas Valley in south-eastern Australia. Detailed mapping of the stratigraphy and an ambitious dating exercise, involving 23 optical dates, have been used to distinguish the different periods of aggradation and incision. The dated alluvial sequence shows that a period of aggradation occurred in the very late Pleistocene (ca. 14,000-12,000�years ago). Alluvial deposits are absent for the period 12,000-3300�years ago. Whether this truly reflects no deposition or a series of aggradation and erosion cycles remains unresolved. Aggradation dominated between 3300 and 900�years ago, punctuated by a short incision event around 1300�years ago. Gully erosion contemporaneous with this incision phase is also recorded. Incision has dominated during the last 900�years, cutting down to bedrock. This incision, which is still ongoing, has not been a continuous process, but involved short periods of aggradation. The exposed bedrock and large boulders display numerous scour holes indicating that bedrock has been exposed and abraided for lengthy periods in the past. The aggradation and incision cycles in the late Holocene gave rise to three groups of terraces, today visible along the study reach. Possible causes for the different periods of erosion and deposition are discussed in the context of late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change, land use impacts, and intrinsic factors. � 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)66-88
    Number of pages23
    JournalGeomorphology
    Volume81
    Issue number1-2
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    aggradation
    Pleistocene
    river
    bedrock
    Holocene
    erosion
    gully erosion
    scour
    alluvial deposit
    terrace
    stratigraphy
    land use
    valley
    climate change

    Cite this

    Eriksson, M., Olley, J., Kilham, D., PIETSCH, T., & Wasson, R. (2006). Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia. Geomorphology, 81(1-2), 66-88.
    Eriksson, M ; Olley, J ; Kilham, D ; PIETSCH, T ; Wasson, Robert. / Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia. In: Geomorphology. 2006 ; Vol. 81, No. 1-2. pp. 66-88.
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    abstract = "Past phases of aggradation and incision have been studied along a 10 km reach in the Naas Valley in south-eastern Australia. Detailed mapping of the stratigraphy and an ambitious dating exercise, involving 23 optical dates, have been used to distinguish the different periods of aggradation and incision. The dated alluvial sequence shows that a period of aggradation occurred in the very late Pleistocene (ca. 14,000-12,000�years ago). Alluvial deposits are absent for the period 12,000-3300�years ago. Whether this truly reflects no deposition or a series of aggradation and erosion cycles remains unresolved. Aggradation dominated between 3300 and 900�years ago, punctuated by a short incision event around 1300�years ago. Gully erosion contemporaneous with this incision phase is also recorded. Incision has dominated during the last 900�years, cutting down to bedrock. This incision, which is still ongoing, has not been a continuous process, but involved short periods of aggradation. The exposed bedrock and large boulders display numerous scour holes indicating that bedrock has been exposed and abraided for lengthy periods in the past. The aggradation and incision cycles in the late Holocene gave rise to three groups of terraces, today visible along the study reach. Possible causes for the different periods of erosion and deposition are discussed in the context of late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change, land use impacts, and intrinsic factors. � 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.",
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    Eriksson, M, Olley, J, Kilham, D, PIETSCH, T & Wasson, R 2006, 'Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia', Geomorphology, vol. 81, no. 1-2, pp. 66-88.

    Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia. / Eriksson, M; Olley, J; Kilham, D; PIETSCH, T; Wasson, Robert.

    In: Geomorphology, Vol. 81, No. 1-2, 2006, p. 66-88.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia

    AU - Eriksson, M

    AU - Olley, J

    AU - Kilham, D

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    AU - Wasson, Robert

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    N2 - Past phases of aggradation and incision have been studied along a 10 km reach in the Naas Valley in south-eastern Australia. Detailed mapping of the stratigraphy and an ambitious dating exercise, involving 23 optical dates, have been used to distinguish the different periods of aggradation and incision. The dated alluvial sequence shows that a period of aggradation occurred in the very late Pleistocene (ca. 14,000-12,000�years ago). Alluvial deposits are absent for the period 12,000-3300�years ago. Whether this truly reflects no deposition or a series of aggradation and erosion cycles remains unresolved. Aggradation dominated between 3300 and 900�years ago, punctuated by a short incision event around 1300�years ago. Gully erosion contemporaneous with this incision phase is also recorded. Incision has dominated during the last 900�years, cutting down to bedrock. This incision, which is still ongoing, has not been a continuous process, but involved short periods of aggradation. The exposed bedrock and large boulders display numerous scour holes indicating that bedrock has been exposed and abraided for lengthy periods in the past. The aggradation and incision cycles in the late Holocene gave rise to three groups of terraces, today visible along the study reach. Possible causes for the different periods of erosion and deposition are discussed in the context of late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change, land use impacts, and intrinsic factors. � 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    AB - Past phases of aggradation and incision have been studied along a 10 km reach in the Naas Valley in south-eastern Australia. Detailed mapping of the stratigraphy and an ambitious dating exercise, involving 23 optical dates, have been used to distinguish the different periods of aggradation and incision. The dated alluvial sequence shows that a period of aggradation occurred in the very late Pleistocene (ca. 14,000-12,000�years ago). Alluvial deposits are absent for the period 12,000-3300�years ago. Whether this truly reflects no deposition or a series of aggradation and erosion cycles remains unresolved. Aggradation dominated between 3300 and 900�years ago, punctuated by a short incision event around 1300�years ago. Gully erosion contemporaneous with this incision phase is also recorded. Incision has dominated during the last 900�years, cutting down to bedrock. This incision, which is still ongoing, has not been a continuous process, but involved short periods of aggradation. The exposed bedrock and large boulders display numerous scour holes indicating that bedrock has been exposed and abraided for lengthy periods in the past. The aggradation and incision cycles in the late Holocene gave rise to three groups of terraces, today visible along the study reach. Possible causes for the different periods of erosion and deposition are discussed in the context of late Pleistocene and Holocene climate change, land use impacts, and intrinsic factors. � 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

    KW - aggradation

    KW - alluvial deposit

    KW - climate change

    KW - erosion

    KW - fluvial geomorphology

    KW - Holocene

    KW - Pleistocene

    KW - river terrace

    KW - sedimentary sequence

    KW - Australasia

    KW - Australia

    KW - Australian Capital Territory

    KW - Naas River

    KW - Namadgi National Park

    M3 - Article

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    SP - 66

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    ER -

    Eriksson M, Olley J, Kilham D, PIETSCH T, Wasson R. Aggradation and incision since the very late Pleistocene in the Naas River, south-eastern Australia. Geomorphology. 2006;81(1-2):66-88.