Albrecht, Aboriginal education and Overcoming Disciplinary Decadence in Australian History

Katherine Ellinghaus, Barry Judd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

This paper explores the work of Lutheran missionary Albrecht who
instituted a privately funded scheme to provide formal education to
Aboriginal children in central Australia. As part of a larger study of
Albrecht and the Aboriginal women who were the subject of his
education scheme, this paper discusses the in loco parentis-style
relationship which existed between Albrecht and Aboriginal students.
The emotional connection between Albrecht and “his girls” stands in
stark contrast to the impersonal bureaucratic and institutional function of
assimilation policies during the same period that propagated the forced
removal of children and attempted destruction of Aboriginal family and
kinship relationships. In outlining the emotional content of this history,
as researchers, one who claims an Indigenous identity position and one
who does not, we argue that engaging with emotions in history is
necessary to avoid what Lewis Gordon has terms “disciplinary
decadence”. As a direct outcome of the case study of Albrecht here
outlined, we argue that a preparedness to dig in the dirt of emotions that
arise at the ontological interface between Australian History and
Australian Indigenous Studies must become an imperative if the
disciplinary decadence that characterises history in Australia is to be
overcome.
URL:
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages26
JournalJournal of Australian Studies
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2020

Fingerprint

history
education
emotion
child education
missionary
Education
Emotion
Australian History
Decadence
History
student
Formal Education
Missionaries
Impersonals
Ontological
Lutheran
Central Australia
Indigenous Identity
Family Relationships
Destruction

Cite this

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Albrecht, Aboriginal education and Overcoming Disciplinary Decadence in Australian History. / Ellinghaus, Katherine; Judd, Barry.

In: Journal of Australian Studies, 2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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