An exploration of the sociodemographic and health conditions associated with self-rated wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults

A. Gall, A. Diaz, G. Garvey, K. Anderson, D. Lindsay, K. Howard

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To identify sociodemographic factors and health conditions associated with self-rated wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults. Participants were recruited via investigator networks and an online panel provider with an established nationwide panel of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults. Those interested were invited to complete a survey that included an assessment of wellbeing using a visual analogue scale. Data was collected from October–November 2019 and August–September 2020. Exploratory analyses were conducted to ascertain factors associated with self-rated wellbeing for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults. 

Results: Having more than enough money to last until next pay day, full-time employment, completion of grade 12, having a partner, and living with others were significantly associated with higher wellbeing among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults. A self-reported history of depression, anxiety, other mental health conditions, heart disease, or disability were associated with lower self-rated wellbeing scores. Our findings indicate a need for further investigation among these socioeconomic and patient groups to identify how to improve and support the wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adults.

Original languageEnglish
Article number386
JournalBMC Research Notes
Volume14
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2021

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