Analysis of National Test Scores in Very Remote Australian Schools: Understanding the Results through a Different Lens.

John Guenther

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

Based on the current research of the Cooperative Research Centre for Remote Economic Participation, this chapter presents an analysis of the 2012 Australian National Assessment Program – Literacy and Numeracy data from very remote schools across Australia. The data support perceptions of apparent failure in remote education for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students. The reasons for this failure are often attributed to disadvantage. In this chapter, the author proposes that the perceptions of failure are built on philosophical, sociological, economic, and psychological assumptions that may not be shared by those who are subjected to tests. It is therefore possible to critique remote education, not as a failure, but as a reflection of the values it embodies. That critique allows for different ways of understanding difference framed around the perspectives that come from the context of very remote schools.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationTransforming the Future of Learning with Educational Research
EditorsHelen Askell-Williams
Place of PublicationUSA
PublisherIGI Global
Chapter7
Pages125-143
Number of pages19
ISBN (Print)978-1-4666-7495-0
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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