Analysis of the interrelationship between houses, trees and damage in a cyclone affected city: Can landscape design and planning utilising trees minimise cyclone impact?

F. J. Van der Sommen, D. M. Pearson, G. S. Boggs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Under scenarios of climate change the likelihood of more intensive extreme weather events like tropical cyclones is expected to increase and many tropical regions most at risk from cyclones are still developing economically. With increased urbanisation predicted over the next 20–50 years to cope with population growth, it is important that planning for urban development in these regions considers amelioration of danger, especially the impacts associated with cyclone damage. Approaches to risk management can learn a lot from past experiences with cyclonic events. The knowledge that was accumulated after the devastation of Darwin, Australia by Cyclone Tracy in 1974 provides important evidence that can contribute towards risk mitigation and disaster management in the future. Applying a mixed methods approach, this study examines historical information collected at the time of Cyclone Tracy to help understand the role of the urban forest and positioning of housing in reducing cyclone damage. It includes a review of whether the pattern of tree cover, which is influenced by geophysical and socio-cultural factors, mitigates or exacerbates cyclone damage. The results of the study show that although the relationship is complex, trees appear to have a role to play in ameliorating cyclone damage under certain conditions. This potential gain, along with the other benefits trees offer to tropical urban areas, means that trees are an important consideration for future urban planning in developing regions.

LanguageEnglish
Pages701-710
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction
Volume28
DOIs
StatePublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

cyclone
damages
Planning
damage
planning
sociocultural factors
event
urban planning
risk management
population growth
urban development
urbanization
disaster
urban area
climate change
housing
disaster management
scenario
Urban planning
tropical region

Cite this

@article{7acc055e0a1f46b89468422f73177473,
title = "Analysis of the interrelationship between houses, trees and damage in a cyclone affected city: Can landscape design and planning utilising trees minimise cyclone impact?",
abstract = "Under scenarios of climate change the likelihood of more intensive extreme weather events like tropical cyclones is expected to increase and many tropical regions most at risk from cyclones are still developing economically. With increased urbanisation predicted over the next 20–50 years to cope with population growth, it is important that planning for urban development in these regions considers amelioration of danger, especially the impacts associated with cyclone damage. Approaches to risk management can learn a lot from past experiences with cyclonic events. The knowledge that was accumulated after the devastation of Darwin, Australia by Cyclone Tracy in 1974 provides important evidence that can contribute towards risk mitigation and disaster management in the future. Applying a mixed methods approach, this study examines historical information collected at the time of Cyclone Tracy to help understand the role of the urban forest and positioning of housing in reducing cyclone damage. It includes a review of whether the pattern of tree cover, which is influenced by geophysical and socio-cultural factors, mitigates or exacerbates cyclone damage. The results of the study show that although the relationship is complex, trees appear to have a role to play in ameliorating cyclone damage under certain conditions. This potential gain, along with the other benefits trees offer to tropical urban areas, means that trees are an important consideration for future urban planning in developing regions.",
keywords = "Arboreal services, Climate change, Disaster management, Green infrastructure, Landscape ecology, Risk mitigation",
author = "{Van der Sommen}, {F. J.} and Pearson, {D. M.} and Boggs, {G. S.}",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijdrr.2018.01.031",
language = "English",
volume = "28",
pages = "701--710",
journal = "International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction",
issn = "2212-4209",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

Analysis of the interrelationship between houses, trees and damage in a cyclone affected city : Can landscape design and planning utilising trees minimise cyclone impact? / Van der Sommen, F. J.; Pearson, D. M.; Boggs, G. S.

In: International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction, Vol. 28, 01.06.2018, p. 701-710.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Analysis of the interrelationship between houses, trees and damage in a cyclone affected city

T2 - International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction

AU - Van der Sommen,F. J.

AU - Pearson,D. M.

AU - Boggs,G. S.

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - Under scenarios of climate change the likelihood of more intensive extreme weather events like tropical cyclones is expected to increase and many tropical regions most at risk from cyclones are still developing economically. With increased urbanisation predicted over the next 20–50 years to cope with population growth, it is important that planning for urban development in these regions considers amelioration of danger, especially the impacts associated with cyclone damage. Approaches to risk management can learn a lot from past experiences with cyclonic events. The knowledge that was accumulated after the devastation of Darwin, Australia by Cyclone Tracy in 1974 provides important evidence that can contribute towards risk mitigation and disaster management in the future. Applying a mixed methods approach, this study examines historical information collected at the time of Cyclone Tracy to help understand the role of the urban forest and positioning of housing in reducing cyclone damage. It includes a review of whether the pattern of tree cover, which is influenced by geophysical and socio-cultural factors, mitigates or exacerbates cyclone damage. The results of the study show that although the relationship is complex, trees appear to have a role to play in ameliorating cyclone damage under certain conditions. This potential gain, along with the other benefits trees offer to tropical urban areas, means that trees are an important consideration for future urban planning in developing regions.

AB - Under scenarios of climate change the likelihood of more intensive extreme weather events like tropical cyclones is expected to increase and many tropical regions most at risk from cyclones are still developing economically. With increased urbanisation predicted over the next 20–50 years to cope with population growth, it is important that planning for urban development in these regions considers amelioration of danger, especially the impacts associated with cyclone damage. Approaches to risk management can learn a lot from past experiences with cyclonic events. The knowledge that was accumulated after the devastation of Darwin, Australia by Cyclone Tracy in 1974 provides important evidence that can contribute towards risk mitigation and disaster management in the future. Applying a mixed methods approach, this study examines historical information collected at the time of Cyclone Tracy to help understand the role of the urban forest and positioning of housing in reducing cyclone damage. It includes a review of whether the pattern of tree cover, which is influenced by geophysical and socio-cultural factors, mitigates or exacerbates cyclone damage. The results of the study show that although the relationship is complex, trees appear to have a role to play in ameliorating cyclone damage under certain conditions. This potential gain, along with the other benefits trees offer to tropical urban areas, means that trees are an important consideration for future urban planning in developing regions.

KW - Arboreal services

KW - Climate change

KW - Disaster management

KW - Green infrastructure

KW - Landscape ecology

KW - Risk mitigation

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041952564&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2018.01.031

DO - 10.1016/j.ijdrr.2018.01.031

M3 - Article

VL - 28

SP - 701

EP - 710

JO - International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction

JF - International Journal of Disaster Risk Reduction

SN - 2212-4209

ER -