Antibiotic Prescribing in DR Congo: A Knowledge, Attitude and Practice Survey among Medical Doctors and Students

Kamala Ley-Thriemer, Yves Katuala, Bibi Batoko, Jean-Pierre Alworonga, Hugo Devlieger, Christel Van Geet, Dauly Ngbonda, Jan Jacobs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

    Abstract

    Objectives: Antibiotic resistance (ABR) particularly hits resource poor countries, and is fuelled by irrational antibiotic (AB) prescribing. We surveyed knowledge, attitudes and practices of AB prescribing among medical students and doctors in Kisangani, DR Congo.

    Methods: Self-administered questionnaires.

    Results: A total of 184 questionnaires were completed (response rate 94.4%). Knowledge about AB was low (mean score 4.9/8 points), as was the estimation of local resistance rates of S. Typhi and Klebsiella spp.(correct by 42.5% and 6.9% of respondents respectively). ABR was recognized as a problem though less in their own practice (67.4%) than nation- or worldwide (92.9% and 85.5%, p<.0001). Confidence in AB prescribing was high (88.6%) and students consulted more frequently colleagues than medical doctors when prescribing (25.4% versus 11.6%, p = 0.19). Sources of AB prescribing included pharmaceutical companies (73.9%), antibiotic guidelines (66.3%), university courses (63.6%), internet-sites (45.7%) and WHO guidelines (26.6%). Only 30.4% and 16.3% respondents perceived AB procured through the central procurement and local pharmacies as of good quality. Local AB guidelines and courses about AB prescribing are welcomed (73.4% and 98.8% respectively).

    Conclusions: This data shows the need for interventions that support rational AB prescribing.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere55495
    Pages (from-to)1-8
    Number of pages8
    JournalPLoS One
    Volume8
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2013

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