Are male partners of pregnant women treated negatively in maternity care?

Christian Wright, Sadie Geraghty

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Background: There has been a significant cultural shift in attitudes towards male partners' involvement in maternity care, resulting in a cultural acceptance that male partners should be involved throughout pregnancy and birth. Anecdotal evidence, however, shows that male partners may still experience negative attitudes from obstetric and midwifery professionals.

Aim: To explore midwifery students' experiences of negative attitudes or behaviour directed toward male partners by women, midwives, and/or doctors during antenatal and intrapartum care.

Methods: An open online anonymous survey was used to collect data from 21 midwifery students.

Findings: Two main themes were revealed: observed negative behaviours, and behaviour reasoning. Each theme contained several sub-themes, namely aggression, exclusion, and condescension (observed negative behaviours), and excusable by pain, preoccupied, misplaced support and respectful inclusion (behaviour reasoning).

Conclusions: The accommodation of male partners into maternity settings does not always meet their needs, and is at time disempowering through negative attitudes and behaviours.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)631-637
Number of pages7
JournalBritish Journal of Midwifery
Volume25
Issue number10
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Oct 2017
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Pregnant Women
Midwifery
Students
Prenatal Care
Aggression
Obstetrics
Parturition
Pain
Pregnancy

Cite this

Wright, Christian ; Geraghty, Sadie. / Are male partners of pregnant women treated negatively in maternity care?. In: British Journal of Midwifery. 2017 ; Vol. 25, No. 10. pp. 631-637.
@article{56399fbe41a84550855387202e8c9609,
title = "Are male partners of pregnant women treated negatively in maternity care?",
abstract = "Background: There has been a significant cultural shift in attitudes towards male partners' involvement in maternity care, resulting in a cultural acceptance that male partners should be involved throughout pregnancy and birth. Anecdotal evidence, however, shows that male partners may still experience negative attitudes from obstetric and midwifery professionals. Aim: To explore midwifery students' experiences of negative attitudes or behaviour directed toward male partners by women, midwives, and/or doctors during antenatal and intrapartum care. Methods: An open online anonymous survey was used to collect data from 21 midwifery students. Findings: Two main themes were revealed: observed negative behaviours, and behaviour reasoning. Each theme contained several sub-themes, namely aggression, exclusion, and condescension (observed negative behaviours), and excusable by pain, preoccupied, misplaced support and respectful inclusion (behaviour reasoning). Conclusions: The accommodation of male partners into maternity settings does not always meet their needs, and is at time disempowering through negative attitudes and behaviours.",
keywords = "Antepartum care, Midwifery, Postgraduate, Pregnancy",
author = "Christian Wright and Sadie Geraghty",
note = "Published Online:11 Oct 2017",
year = "2017",
month = "10",
day = "2",
doi = "10.12968/bjom.2017.25.10.631",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "631--637",
journal = "British Journal of Midwifery",
issn = "0969-4900",
publisher = "MA Healthcare Ltd",
number = "10",

}

Are male partners of pregnant women treated negatively in maternity care? / Wright, Christian; Geraghty, Sadie.

In: British Journal of Midwifery, Vol. 25, No. 10, 02.10.2017, p. 631-637.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Are male partners of pregnant women treated negatively in maternity care?

AU - Wright, Christian

AU - Geraghty, Sadie

N1 - Published Online:11 Oct 2017

PY - 2017/10/2

Y1 - 2017/10/2

N2 - Background: There has been a significant cultural shift in attitudes towards male partners' involvement in maternity care, resulting in a cultural acceptance that male partners should be involved throughout pregnancy and birth. Anecdotal evidence, however, shows that male partners may still experience negative attitudes from obstetric and midwifery professionals. Aim: To explore midwifery students' experiences of negative attitudes or behaviour directed toward male partners by women, midwives, and/or doctors during antenatal and intrapartum care. Methods: An open online anonymous survey was used to collect data from 21 midwifery students. Findings: Two main themes were revealed: observed negative behaviours, and behaviour reasoning. Each theme contained several sub-themes, namely aggression, exclusion, and condescension (observed negative behaviours), and excusable by pain, preoccupied, misplaced support and respectful inclusion (behaviour reasoning). Conclusions: The accommodation of male partners into maternity settings does not always meet their needs, and is at time disempowering through negative attitudes and behaviours.

AB - Background: There has been a significant cultural shift in attitudes towards male partners' involvement in maternity care, resulting in a cultural acceptance that male partners should be involved throughout pregnancy and birth. Anecdotal evidence, however, shows that male partners may still experience negative attitudes from obstetric and midwifery professionals. Aim: To explore midwifery students' experiences of negative attitudes or behaviour directed toward male partners by women, midwives, and/or doctors during antenatal and intrapartum care. Methods: An open online anonymous survey was used to collect data from 21 midwifery students. Findings: Two main themes were revealed: observed negative behaviours, and behaviour reasoning. Each theme contained several sub-themes, namely aggression, exclusion, and condescension (observed negative behaviours), and excusable by pain, preoccupied, misplaced support and respectful inclusion (behaviour reasoning). Conclusions: The accommodation of male partners into maternity settings does not always meet their needs, and is at time disempowering through negative attitudes and behaviours.

KW - Antepartum care

KW - Midwifery

KW - Postgraduate

KW - Pregnancy

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032000042&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.12968/bjom.2017.25.10.631

DO - 10.12968/bjom.2017.25.10.631

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 631

EP - 637

JO - British Journal of Midwifery

JF - British Journal of Midwifery

SN - 0969-4900

IS - 10

ER -