Associations between aggressive behaviour scores and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood

S Louise, N Warrington, P McCaskie, Wendy Oddy, Stephen Zubrick, Beth P Hands, T Mori, L Briollais, Sven Silburn, L Palmer, E Mattes, Lawrence Beilin

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: To examine the influence of aggressive behaviour scores on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors throughout childhood.

    Methods: This study utilized cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study (n = 2900). Aggressive behaviour scores were derived from the Child Behavior Checklist/4–18(CBCL), Youth Self-Report/11–18 (YSR) and Teacher Report Form/6–18 (TRF). CVD risk factors included body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting lipids and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).

    Results: Girls with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI from 10 years of age (P ≤ 0.001), higher BMI trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.0003) and at 14 years higher HOMA-IR (P = 0.008). At the 14-year survey, this equated to a difference of 1.7 kg/m2 in the predicted BMI between the extreme CBCL scores in girls (top 5% (CBCL ≥ 17) vs. CBCL score = 0). Boys with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI at 5 years (P = 0.002), lower diastolic pressure at 14 years (P = 0.002) and lower systolic blood pressure trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.016).

    Conclusion: Aggressive behaviour influences BMI from early childhood in girls but not boys. If this association is causal, childhood offers the opportunity for early behavioural intervention for obesity prevention.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)319-328
    Number of pages10
    JournalPediatric Obesity
    Volume7
    Issue number4
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2012

    Fingerprint

    Body Mass Index
    Child Behavior
    Checklist
    Blood Pressure
    Insulin Resistance
    Homeostasis
    Cardiovascular Diseases
    Self Report
    Fasting
    Cohort Studies
    Obesity
    Cross-Sectional Studies
    Lipids
    Pregnancy

    Cite this

    Louise, S., Warrington, N., McCaskie, P., Oddy, W., Zubrick, S., Hands, B. P., ... Beilin, L. (2012). Associations between aggressive behaviour scores and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood. Pediatric Obesity, 7(4), 319-328. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2047-6310.2012.00047.x
    Louise, S ; Warrington, N ; McCaskie, P ; Oddy, Wendy ; Zubrick, Stephen ; Hands, Beth P ; Mori, T ; Briollais, L ; Silburn, Sven ; Palmer, L ; Mattes, E ; Beilin, Lawrence. / Associations between aggressive behaviour scores and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood. In: Pediatric Obesity. 2012 ; Vol. 7, No. 4. pp. 319-328.
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    abstract = "Objective: To examine the influence of aggressive behaviour scores on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors throughout childhood.Methods: This study utilized cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study (n = 2900). Aggressive behaviour scores were derived from the Child Behavior Checklist/4–18(CBCL), Youth Self-Report/11–18 (YSR) and Teacher Report Form/6–18 (TRF). CVD risk factors included body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting lipids and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).Results: Girls with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI from 10 years of age (P ≤ 0.001), higher BMI trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.0003) and at 14 years higher HOMA-IR (P = 0.008). At the 14-year survey, this equated to a difference of 1.7 kg/m2 in the predicted BMI between the extreme CBCL scores in girls (top 5{\%} (CBCL ≥ 17) vs. CBCL score = 0). Boys with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI at 5 years (P = 0.002), lower diastolic pressure at 14 years (P = 0.002) and lower systolic blood pressure trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.016).Conclusion: Aggressive behaviour influences BMI from early childhood in girls but not boys. If this association is causal, childhood offers the opportunity for early behavioural intervention for obesity prevention.",
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    author = "S Louise and N Warrington and P McCaskie and Wendy Oddy and Stephen Zubrick and Hands, {Beth P} and T Mori and L Briollais and Sven Silburn and L Palmer and E Mattes and Lawrence Beilin",
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    Louise, S, Warrington, N, McCaskie, P, Oddy, W, Zubrick, S, Hands, BP, Mori, T, Briollais, L, Silburn, S, Palmer, L, Mattes, E & Beilin, L 2012, 'Associations between aggressive behaviour scores and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood', Pediatric Obesity, vol. 7, no. 4, pp. 319-328. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.2047-6310.2012.00047.x

    Associations between aggressive behaviour scores and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood. / Louise, S; Warrington, N; McCaskie, P; Oddy, Wendy; Zubrick, Stephen; Hands, Beth P; Mori, T; Briollais, L; Silburn, Sven; Palmer, L; Mattes, E; Beilin, Lawrence.

    In: Pediatric Obesity, Vol. 7, No. 4, 08.2012, p. 319-328.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Associations between aggressive behaviour scores and cardiovascular risk factors in childhood

    AU - Louise, S

    AU - Warrington, N

    AU - McCaskie, P

    AU - Oddy, Wendy

    AU - Zubrick, Stephen

    AU - Hands, Beth P

    AU - Mori, T

    AU - Briollais, L

    AU - Silburn, Sven

    AU - Palmer, L

    AU - Mattes, E

    AU - Beilin, Lawrence

    PY - 2012/8

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    N2 - Objective: To examine the influence of aggressive behaviour scores on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors throughout childhood.Methods: This study utilized cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study (n = 2900). Aggressive behaviour scores were derived from the Child Behavior Checklist/4–18(CBCL), Youth Self-Report/11–18 (YSR) and Teacher Report Form/6–18 (TRF). CVD risk factors included body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting lipids and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).Results: Girls with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI from 10 years of age (P ≤ 0.001), higher BMI trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.0003) and at 14 years higher HOMA-IR (P = 0.008). At the 14-year survey, this equated to a difference of 1.7 kg/m2 in the predicted BMI between the extreme CBCL scores in girls (top 5% (CBCL ≥ 17) vs. CBCL score = 0). Boys with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI at 5 years (P = 0.002), lower diastolic pressure at 14 years (P = 0.002) and lower systolic blood pressure trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.016).Conclusion: Aggressive behaviour influences BMI from early childhood in girls but not boys. If this association is causal, childhood offers the opportunity for early behavioural intervention for obesity prevention.

    AB - Objective: To examine the influence of aggressive behaviour scores on cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors throughout childhood.Methods: This study utilized cross-sectional and longitudinal data from the Western Australian Pregnancy Cohort (Raine) Study (n = 2900). Aggressive behaviour scores were derived from the Child Behavior Checklist/4–18(CBCL), Youth Self-Report/11–18 (YSR) and Teacher Report Form/6–18 (TRF). CVD risk factors included body mass index (BMI), blood pressure, fasting lipids and homeostasis model of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR).Results: Girls with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI from 10 years of age (P ≤ 0.001), higher BMI trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.0003) and at 14 years higher HOMA-IR (P = 0.008). At the 14-year survey, this equated to a difference of 1.7 kg/m2 in the predicted BMI between the extreme CBCL scores in girls (top 5% (CBCL ≥ 17) vs. CBCL score = 0). Boys with higher aggressive behaviour scores had higher BMI at 5 years (P = 0.002), lower diastolic pressure at 14 years (P = 0.002) and lower systolic blood pressure trajectories throughout childhood (P = 0.016).Conclusion: Aggressive behaviour influences BMI from early childhood in girls but not boys. If this association is causal, childhood offers the opportunity for early behavioural intervention for obesity prevention.

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