Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory

Bo Cheng Kuo, Mark G. Stokes, Alexandra M. Murray, Anna Christina Nobre

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

In the current study, we tested whether representations in visual STM (VSTM) can be biased via top-down attentional modulation of visual activity in retinotopically specific locations. We manipulated attention using retrospective cues presented during the retention interval of a VSTM task. Retrospective cues triggered activity in a large-scale network implicated in atten-tional control and led to retinotopically specific modulation of activity in early visual areas V1-V4. Importantly, shifts of attention during VSTM maintenance were associated with changes in functional connectivity between pFC and retinotopic regions within V4. Our findings provide new insights into top-down control mechanisms that modulate VSTM representations for flexible and goal-directed maintenance of the most relevant memoranda.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1377-1389
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Cognitive Neuroscience
Volume26
Issue number7
Early online date29 May 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Short-Term Memory
Cues
Maintenance
trend
memorandum
Visual Short-term Memory
Retention (Psychology)
Top-down
Modulation

Cite this

Kuo, B. C., Stokes, M. G., Murray, A. M., & Nobre, A. C. (2014). Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 26(7), 1377-1389. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00577
Kuo, Bo Cheng ; Stokes, Mark G. ; Murray, Alexandra M. ; Nobre, Anna Christina. / Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory. In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience. 2014 ; Vol. 26, No. 7. pp. 1377-1389.
@article{8795bb0d8d614223bfbb7f7bdced5acb,
title = "Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory",
abstract = "In the current study, we tested whether representations in visual STM (VSTM) can be biased via top-down attentional modulation of visual activity in retinotopically specific locations. We manipulated attention using retrospective cues presented during the retention interval of a VSTM task. Retrospective cues triggered activity in a large-scale network implicated in atten-tional control and led to retinotopically specific modulation of activity in early visual areas V1-V4. Importantly, shifts of attention during VSTM maintenance were associated with changes in functional connectivity between pFC and retinotopic regions within V4. Our findings provide new insights into top-down control mechanisms that modulate VSTM representations for flexible and goal-directed maintenance of the most relevant memoranda.",
author = "Kuo, {Bo Cheng} and Stokes, {Mark G.} and Murray, {Alexandra M.} and Nobre, {Anna Christina}",
year = "2014",
month = "7",
doi = "10.1162/jocn_a_00577",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "1377--1389",
journal = "Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience",
issn = "0898-929X",
publisher = "MIT Press - Journals",
number = "7",

}

Kuo, BC, Stokes, MG, Murray, AM & Nobre, AC 2014, 'Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory', Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, vol. 26, no. 7, pp. 1377-1389. https://doi.org/10.1162/jocn_a_00577

Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory. / Kuo, Bo Cheng; Stokes, Mark G.; Murray, Alexandra M.; Nobre, Anna Christina.

In: Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 26, No. 7, 07.2014, p. 1377-1389.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Attention biases visual activity in visual short-term memory

AU - Kuo, Bo Cheng

AU - Stokes, Mark G.

AU - Murray, Alexandra M.

AU - Nobre, Anna Christina

PY - 2014/7

Y1 - 2014/7

N2 - In the current study, we tested whether representations in visual STM (VSTM) can be biased via top-down attentional modulation of visual activity in retinotopically specific locations. We manipulated attention using retrospective cues presented during the retention interval of a VSTM task. Retrospective cues triggered activity in a large-scale network implicated in atten-tional control and led to retinotopically specific modulation of activity in early visual areas V1-V4. Importantly, shifts of attention during VSTM maintenance were associated with changes in functional connectivity between pFC and retinotopic regions within V4. Our findings provide new insights into top-down control mechanisms that modulate VSTM representations for flexible and goal-directed maintenance of the most relevant memoranda.

AB - In the current study, we tested whether representations in visual STM (VSTM) can be biased via top-down attentional modulation of visual activity in retinotopically specific locations. We manipulated attention using retrospective cues presented during the retention interval of a VSTM task. Retrospective cues triggered activity in a large-scale network implicated in atten-tional control and led to retinotopically specific modulation of activity in early visual areas V1-V4. Importantly, shifts of attention during VSTM maintenance were associated with changes in functional connectivity between pFC and retinotopic regions within V4. Our findings provide new insights into top-down control mechanisms that modulate VSTM representations for flexible and goal-directed maintenance of the most relevant memoranda.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901619835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1162/jocn_a_00577

DO - 10.1162/jocn_a_00577

M3 - Article

VL - 26

SP - 1377

EP - 1389

JO - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

JF - Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience

SN - 0898-929X

IS - 7

ER -