Australian higher education leaders in times of change

the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellor

Geoff Scott, Sharon Bell, Hamish Coates, Leonid Grebennikov

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This paper discusses responses provided by 31 Pro Vice-Chancellors (PVCs) and Deputy Vice-Chancellors (DVCs) who were part of a larger study of more than 500 higher education leaders in roles ranging from DVC to head of programme in 20 Australian universities. Using both quantitative and qualitative data the paper gives an insider's perspective on what the roles of DVC and PVC are like at the daily level. It identifies the key focus of the roles, highlights the criteria these leaders use to judge that they are effectively performing them and outlines the relative impact of different influences on their work. It then discusses their views on what being in such a role is like, including its key satisfactions and challenges; and identifies the capabilities seen to be central to managing in such a context. Finally, it provides insights into how such leaders have gone about learning their role.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)401-418
    Number of pages18
    JournalJournal of Higher Education Policy and Management
    Volume32
    Issue number4
    Early online date9 Jul 2010
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2010

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    Scott, Geoff ; Bell, Sharon ; Coates, Hamish ; Grebennikov, Leonid. / Australian higher education leaders in times of change : the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellor. In: Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management. 2010 ; Vol. 32, No. 4. pp. 401-418.
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    Australian higher education leaders in times of change : the role of Pro Vice-Chancellor and Deputy Vice-Chancellor. / Scott, Geoff; Bell, Sharon; Coates, Hamish; Grebennikov, Leonid.

    In: Journal of Higher Education Policy and Management, Vol. 32, No. 4, 08.2010, p. 401-418.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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