Avoiding treatment interruptions

What role do Australian community pharmacists play?

Salem Hasn Abukres, Kreshnik Hoti, Jeffery David Hughes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Objective: To explore the reported practice of Australian community pharmacists when dealing with medication supply requests in absence of a valid prescription.

Methods: Self-administered questionnaire was posted to 1490 randomly selected community pharmacies across all Australian states and territories. This sample was estimated to be a 20% of all Australian community pharmacies.

Results: Three hundred eighty five pharmacists participated in the study (response rate achieved was 27.9% (there were 111 undelivered questionnaires). Respondents indicated that they were more likely to provide medications to regular customers without a valid prescription compared to non-regular customers (p<0.0001). However, supply was also influenced by the type of prescription and the medication requested. In the case of type of prescription (Standard, Authority or Private) this relates to the complexity/probability of obtaining a valid prescription from the prescriber at a later date (i.e. supply with an anticipated prescription). Decisions to supply and/or not supply related to medication type were more complex. For some cases, including medication with potential for abuse, the practice and/or the method of supply varied significantly according to age and gender of the pharmacist, and pharmacy location (p<0.05).

Conclusions: Although being a regular customer does not guarantee a supply, results of this study reinforce the importance for patients having a regular pharmacy, where pharmacists were more likely to continue medication supply in cases of patients presenting without a valid prescription. We would suggest, more flexible legislation should be implemented to allow pharmacists to continue supplying of medication when obtaining a prescription is not practical.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbere0154992
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalPLoS One
Volume11
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 12 May 2016
Externally publishedYes

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Pharmacists
Prescriptions
drug therapy
Pharmacies
Therapeutics
questionnaires
Legislation
laws and regulations
gender
methodology
Surveys and Questionnaires

Cite this

Abukres, Salem Hasn ; Hoti, Kreshnik ; Hughes, Jeffery David. / Avoiding treatment interruptions : What role do Australian community pharmacists play?. In: PLoS One. 2016 ; Vol. 11, No. 5. pp. 1-16.
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Avoiding treatment interruptions : What role do Australian community pharmacists play? / Abukres, Salem Hasn; Hoti, Kreshnik; Hughes, Jeffery David.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 11, No. 5, e0154992, 12.05.2016, p. 1-16.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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