Baseline incidence of adverse birth outcomes and infant influenza and pertussis hospitalisations prior to the introduction of influenza and pertussis vaccination in pregnancy

A data linkage study of 78 382 mother–infant pairs, Northern Territory, Australia, 1994–2015

Lisa Mchugh, Ross Andrews, Bernard Leckning, Thomas Snelling, Michael Binks

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    We conducted probabilistic data linkage of three population datasets for the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, to describe the incidence of preterm births, stillbirths, low birthweight and small for gestational age (SGA) per 1000 NT births; and influenza and pertussis hospitalisations per 1 00 000 NT births in infants <7 months of age, in a pre-maternal vaccination era. The Perinatal Trends dataset (1994–2014) formed the cohort of 78 382 births. Aboriginal mother–infant pairs (37%) had disproportionately higher average annual rates (AR) for all adverse birth outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts; rate ratios: preterm births 2.2 (AR 142.4 vs. 64.7); stillbirths 2.3 (AR 10.8 vs. 4.6); low birthweight 2.9 (AR 54 vs. 19); and SGA 1.7 (AR 187 vs. 111). Hospitalisation (2000–2015) and Immunisation Register datasets (1994–2015), showed that influenza hospitalisations (n = 53) and rates were 42.3 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 254 vs. 6); and that pertussis hospitalisations (n = 37) were 7.1 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 142.5 vs. 20.2) compared to non-Aboriginal infants. These baseline data are essential to assess the safety and effectiveness of influenza and pertussis vaccinations in pregnant women from the NT. Remote living Aboriginal women and infants stand to benefit the most from these vaccines.

    Original languageEnglish
    Article numbere233
    Pages (from-to)1-11
    Number of pages11
    JournalEpidemiology and Infection
    Volume147
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 4 Jul 2019

    Fingerprint

    Northern Territory
    Whooping Cough
    Information Storage and Retrieval
    Human Influenza
    Vaccination
    Hospitalization
    Parturition
    Pregnancy
    Incidence
    Stillbirth
    Premature Birth
    Gestational Age
    Pregnant Women
    Immunization
    Vaccines
    Mothers
    Safety
    Population
    Datasets

    Cite this

    @article{905a5101c9124900acacc76084e49933,
    title = "Baseline incidence of adverse birth outcomes and infant influenza and pertussis hospitalisations prior to the introduction of influenza and pertussis vaccination in pregnancy: A data linkage study of 78 382 mother–infant pairs, Northern Territory, Australia, 1994–2015",
    abstract = "We conducted probabilistic data linkage of three population datasets for the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, to describe the incidence of preterm births, stillbirths, low birthweight and small for gestational age (SGA) per 1000 NT births; and influenza and pertussis hospitalisations per 1 00 000 NT births in infants <7 months of age, in a pre-maternal vaccination era. The Perinatal Trends dataset (1994–2014) formed the cohort of 78 382 births. Aboriginal mother–infant pairs (37{\%}) had disproportionately higher average annual rates (AR) for all adverse birth outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts; rate ratios: preterm births 2.2 (AR 142.4 vs. 64.7); stillbirths 2.3 (AR 10.8 vs. 4.6); low birthweight 2.9 (AR 54 vs. 19); and SGA 1.7 (AR 187 vs. 111). Hospitalisation (2000–2015) and Immunisation Register datasets (1994–2015), showed that influenza hospitalisations (n = 53) and rates were 42.3 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 254 vs. 6); and that pertussis hospitalisations (n = 37) were 7.1 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 142.5 vs. 20.2) compared to non-Aboriginal infants. These baseline data are essential to assess the safety and effectiveness of influenza and pertussis vaccinations in pregnant women from the NT. Remote living Aboriginal women and infants stand to benefit the most from these vaccines.",
    keywords = "Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander, Australia, Hospitalisations, Incidence, Infants, Influenza, Pertussis",
    author = "Lisa Mchugh and Ross Andrews and Bernard Leckning and Thomas Snelling and Michael Binks",
    year = "2019",
    month = "7",
    day = "4",
    doi = "10.1017/S0950268819001171",
    language = "English",
    volume = "147",
    pages = "1--11",
    journal = "Epidemiology and Infection",
    issn = "0950-2688",
    publisher = "Cambridge University Press",

    }

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Baseline incidence of adverse birth outcomes and infant influenza and pertussis hospitalisations prior to the introduction of influenza and pertussis vaccination in pregnancy

    T2 - A data linkage study of 78 382 mother–infant pairs, Northern Territory, Australia, 1994–2015

    AU - Mchugh, Lisa

    AU - Andrews, Ross

    AU - Leckning, Bernard

    AU - Snelling, Thomas

    AU - Binks, Michael

    PY - 2019/7/4

    Y1 - 2019/7/4

    N2 - We conducted probabilistic data linkage of three population datasets for the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, to describe the incidence of preterm births, stillbirths, low birthweight and small for gestational age (SGA) per 1000 NT births; and influenza and pertussis hospitalisations per 1 00 000 NT births in infants <7 months of age, in a pre-maternal vaccination era. The Perinatal Trends dataset (1994–2014) formed the cohort of 78 382 births. Aboriginal mother–infant pairs (37%) had disproportionately higher average annual rates (AR) for all adverse birth outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts; rate ratios: preterm births 2.2 (AR 142.4 vs. 64.7); stillbirths 2.3 (AR 10.8 vs. 4.6); low birthweight 2.9 (AR 54 vs. 19); and SGA 1.7 (AR 187 vs. 111). Hospitalisation (2000–2015) and Immunisation Register datasets (1994–2015), showed that influenza hospitalisations (n = 53) and rates were 42.3 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 254 vs. 6); and that pertussis hospitalisations (n = 37) were 7.1 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 142.5 vs. 20.2) compared to non-Aboriginal infants. These baseline data are essential to assess the safety and effectiveness of influenza and pertussis vaccinations in pregnant women from the NT. Remote living Aboriginal women and infants stand to benefit the most from these vaccines.

    AB - We conducted probabilistic data linkage of three population datasets for the Northern Territory (NT), Australia, to describe the incidence of preterm births, stillbirths, low birthweight and small for gestational age (SGA) per 1000 NT births; and influenza and pertussis hospitalisations per 1 00 000 NT births in infants <7 months of age, in a pre-maternal vaccination era. The Perinatal Trends dataset (1994–2014) formed the cohort of 78 382 births. Aboriginal mother–infant pairs (37%) had disproportionately higher average annual rates (AR) for all adverse birth outcomes compared to their non-Aboriginal counterparts; rate ratios: preterm births 2.2 (AR 142.4 vs. 64.7); stillbirths 2.3 (AR 10.8 vs. 4.6); low birthweight 2.9 (AR 54 vs. 19); and SGA 1.7 (AR 187 vs. 111). Hospitalisation (2000–2015) and Immunisation Register datasets (1994–2015), showed that influenza hospitalisations (n = 53) and rates were 42.3 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 254 vs. 6); and that pertussis hospitalisations (n = 37) were 7.1 times higher in Aboriginal infants (AR 142.5 vs. 20.2) compared to non-Aboriginal infants. These baseline data are essential to assess the safety and effectiveness of influenza and pertussis vaccinations in pregnant women from the NT. Remote living Aboriginal women and infants stand to benefit the most from these vaccines.

    KW - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

    KW - Australia

    KW - Hospitalisations

    KW - Incidence

    KW - Infants

    KW - Influenza

    KW - Pertussis

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070840527&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1017/S0950268819001171

    DO - 10.1017/S0950268819001171

    M3 - Article

    VL - 147

    SP - 1

    EP - 11

    JO - Epidemiology and Infection

    JF - Epidemiology and Infection

    SN - 0950-2688

    M1 - e233

    ER -