Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia

M. J. Lydeamore, P. T. Campbell, W. Cuningham, R. M. Andrews, T. Kearns, D. Clucas, R. Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay, J. Carapetis, S. Y.C. Tong, J. M. McCaw, J. McVernon

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Prevalence of skin sores and scabies in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remains unacceptably high, with Group A Streptococcus (GAS) the dominant pathogen. We aim to better understand the drivers of GAS transmission using mathematical models. To estimate the force of infection, we quantified the age of first skin sores and scabies infection by pooling historical data from three studies conducted across five remote Aboriginal communities for children born between 2001 and 2005. We estimated the age of the first infection using the Kaplan–Meier estimator; parametric exponential mixture model; and Cox proportional hazards. For skin sores, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 10 months and the median was 7 months, with some heterogeneity in median observed by the community. For scabies, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 9 months and the median was 8 months, with significant heterogeneity by the community and an enhanced risk for children born between October and December. The young age of the first infection with skin sores and scabies reflects the high disease burden in these communities.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1194-1201
    Number of pages8
    JournalEpidemiology and Infection
    Volume146
    Issue number9
    Early online date8 May 2018
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

    Fingerprint

    Scabies
    Skin
    Infection
    Streptococcus
    Meta-Analysis
    Theoretical Models

    Cite this

    Lydeamore, M. J. ; Campbell, P. T. ; Cuningham, W. ; Andrews, R. M. ; Kearns, T. ; Clucas, D. ; Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay, R. ; Carapetis, J. ; Tong, S. Y.C. ; McCaw, J. M. ; McVernon, J. / Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia. In: Epidemiology and Infection. 2018 ; Vol. 146, No. 9. pp. 1194-1201.
    @article{260f04ed4dfe450e83d37865dcbea8c4,
    title = "Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia",
    abstract = "Prevalence of skin sores and scabies in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remains unacceptably high, with Group A Streptococcus (GAS) the dominant pathogen. We aim to better understand the drivers of GAS transmission using mathematical models. To estimate the force of infection, we quantified the age of first skin sores and scabies infection by pooling historical data from three studies conducted across five remote Aboriginal communities for children born between 2001 and 2005. We estimated the age of the first infection using the Kaplan–Meier estimator; parametric exponential mixture model; and Cox proportional hazards. For skin sores, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 10 months and the median was 7 months, with some heterogeneity in median observed by the community. For scabies, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 9 months and the median was 8 months, with significant heterogeneity by the community and an enhanced risk for children born between October and December. The young age of the first infection with skin sores and scabies reflects the high disease burden in these communities.",
    keywords = "aboriginal health, age of first infection, northern territory, scabies, Skin Sores",
    author = "Lydeamore, {M. J.} and Campbell, {P. T.} and W. Cuningham and Andrews, {R. M.} and T. Kearns and D. Clucas and {Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay}, R. and J. Carapetis and Tong, {S. Y.C.} and McCaw, {J. M.} and J. McVernon",
    year = "2018",
    month = "7",
    day = "1",
    doi = "10.1017/S0950268818001061",
    language = "English",
    volume = "146",
    pages = "1194--1201",
    journal = "Epidemiology and Infection",
    issn = "0950-2688",
    publisher = "Cambridge University Press",
    number = "9",

    }

    Lydeamore, MJ, Campbell, PT, Cuningham, W, Andrews, RM, Kearns, T, Clucas, D, Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay, R, Carapetis, J, Tong, SYC, McCaw, JM & McVernon, J 2018, 'Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia', Epidemiology and Infection, vol. 146, no. 9, pp. 1194-1201. https://doi.org/10.1017/S0950268818001061

    Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia. / Lydeamore, M. J.; Campbell, P. T.; Cuningham, W. ; Andrews, R. M.; Kearns, T.; Clucas, D.; Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay, R.; Carapetis, J.; Tong, S. Y.C.; McCaw, J. M.; McVernon, J.

    In: Epidemiology and Infection, Vol. 146, No. 9, 01.07.2018, p. 1194-1201.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Calculation of the age of the first infection for skin sores and scabies in five remote communities in northern Australia

    AU - Lydeamore, M. J.

    AU - Campbell, P. T.

    AU - Cuningham, W.

    AU - Andrews, R. M.

    AU - Kearns, T.

    AU - Clucas, D.

    AU - Gundjirryirr Dhurrkay, R.

    AU - Carapetis, J.

    AU - Tong, S. Y.C.

    AU - McCaw, J. M.

    AU - McVernon, J.

    PY - 2018/7/1

    Y1 - 2018/7/1

    N2 - Prevalence of skin sores and scabies in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remains unacceptably high, with Group A Streptococcus (GAS) the dominant pathogen. We aim to better understand the drivers of GAS transmission using mathematical models. To estimate the force of infection, we quantified the age of first skin sores and scabies infection by pooling historical data from three studies conducted across five remote Aboriginal communities for children born between 2001 and 2005. We estimated the age of the first infection using the Kaplan–Meier estimator; parametric exponential mixture model; and Cox proportional hazards. For skin sores, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 10 months and the median was 7 months, with some heterogeneity in median observed by the community. For scabies, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 9 months and the median was 8 months, with significant heterogeneity by the community and an enhanced risk for children born between October and December. The young age of the first infection with skin sores and scabies reflects the high disease burden in these communities.

    AB - Prevalence of skin sores and scabies in remote Australian Aboriginal communities remains unacceptably high, with Group A Streptococcus (GAS) the dominant pathogen. We aim to better understand the drivers of GAS transmission using mathematical models. To estimate the force of infection, we quantified the age of first skin sores and scabies infection by pooling historical data from three studies conducted across five remote Aboriginal communities for children born between 2001 and 2005. We estimated the age of the first infection using the Kaplan–Meier estimator; parametric exponential mixture model; and Cox proportional hazards. For skin sores, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 10 months and the median was 7 months, with some heterogeneity in median observed by the community. For scabies, the mean age of the first infection was approximately 9 months and the median was 8 months, with significant heterogeneity by the community and an enhanced risk for children born between October and December. The young age of the first infection with skin sores and scabies reflects the high disease burden in these communities.

    KW - aboriginal health

    KW - age of first infection

    KW - northern territory

    KW - scabies

    KW - Skin Sores

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85046535715&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1017/S0950268818001061

    DO - 10.1017/S0950268818001061

    M3 - Article

    VL - 146

    SP - 1194

    EP - 1201

    JO - Epidemiology and Infection

    JF - Epidemiology and Infection

    SN - 0950-2688

    IS - 9

    ER -