Can creativity be taught?

Bruce Haynes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

The title question and two subsequent questions are considered in the context of rational creativity. A-rational creativity is not considered. 

Q. Can creativity be taught? 

A. It depends on what is meant by ‘creativity’ and ‘taught’ in what context. 

Q1. Is teaching either creativity or critical thinking inimical to the practice of the other? 

A1. Not necessarily, each is required for the success of the other and both are required for successful living. 

Q2. Are Australian schools and universities a good place to learn critical thinking and creativity? 

A2. Yes, when teachers teach with sensitivity to the actual needs of students; No, if accountability standards are applied narrowly through testing and ranking to inhibit the practice and reward of critical thinking and creativity in the classroom; and Perhaps Yes, if new creativity tests are devised to help teachers create classrooms that encourage and reward creativity across the curriculum.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)34-44
Number of pages11
JournalEducational Philosophy and Theory
Volume52
Issue number1
Early online date2 Apr 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 2 Apr 2019

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Critical Thinking

Cite this

Haynes, Bruce. / Can creativity be taught?. In: Educational Philosophy and Theory. 2020 ; Vol. 52, No. 1. pp. 34-44.
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Can creativity be taught? / Haynes, Bruce.

In: Educational Philosophy and Theory, Vol. 52, No. 1, 01.2020, p. 34-44.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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