Can further energy reductions be achieved through behaviour changes in low income households?

Jeremy Trombley, Edward Halawa

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    2 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    Smart Cooling in the Tropics (SCIT) was a project whose main goals were to create energy savings and improve human thermal comfort in low income households located in Darwin, Australia. The project was funded through the Australian Government's Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (LIEEP). The attitudes and behaviours of the 476 participants were investigated through a series of surveys. Each participant was allocated a single, focused treatment based on the results from a home energy assessment. The impediments to energy savings were found to be diverse among participants, so having an individualized treatment plan was necessary to ensure it was appropriate for each participant. One particular aspect of the project that is examined here was the energy savings brought about using education to initiate behaviour changes in participants to reduce their electricity usage. The data collected showed that participants were already actively trying to reduce their consumption through common energy-saving practices before joining SCIT, which were the main energy-saving practices proposed through SCIT, and so further significant reductions through behaviour changes were not likely. At the conclusion of the project, over half of the participants identified a range of barriers still preventing them from additional savings and are described herein. The project was successful in improving thermal comfort levels in participating homes, as demonstrated by over 76% of participants saying they felt cooler/more comfortable because of their involvement. Furthermore, it was found that non-energy benefits were valued higher than energy savings, and improvements in comfort were the most identified and highest rated of all benefits.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)230-237
    Number of pages8
    JournalEnergy Procedia
    Volume121
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017
    EventImproving Residential Energy Efficiency International Conference - Wollongong, Australia
    Duration: 16 Feb 201717 Feb 2017
    http://iree.org.au/

    Fingerprint

    Energy conservation
    Tropics
    Thermal comfort
    Cooling
    Joining
    Energy efficiency
    Electricity
    Education

    Cite this

    @article{63545195df4e45a7939a00d4c288529d,
    title = "Can further energy reductions be achieved through behaviour changes in low income households?",
    abstract = "Smart Cooling in the Tropics (SCIT) was a project whose main goals were to create energy savings and improve human thermal comfort in low income households located in Darwin, Australia. The project was funded through the Australian Government's Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (LIEEP). The attitudes and behaviours of the 476 participants were investigated through a series of surveys. Each participant was allocated a single, focused treatment based on the results from a home energy assessment. The impediments to energy savings were found to be diverse among participants, so having an individualized treatment plan was necessary to ensure it was appropriate for each participant. One particular aspect of the project that is examined here was the energy savings brought about using education to initiate behaviour changes in participants to reduce their electricity usage. The data collected showed that participants were already actively trying to reduce their consumption through common energy-saving practices before joining SCIT, which were the main energy-saving practices proposed through SCIT, and so further significant reductions through behaviour changes were not likely. At the conclusion of the project, over half of the participants identified a range of barriers still preventing them from additional savings and are described herein. The project was successful in improving thermal comfort levels in participating homes, as demonstrated by over 76{\%} of participants saying they felt cooler/more comfortable because of their involvement. Furthermore, it was found that non-energy benefits were valued higher than energy savings, and improvements in comfort were the most identified and highest rated of all benefits.",
    keywords = "barriers, behaviour change, energy, low income, non-energy benefits, tropical",
    author = "Jeremy Trombley and Edward Halawa",
    year = "2017",
    month = "9",
    doi = "10.1016/j.egypro.2017.08.022",
    language = "English",
    volume = "121",
    pages = "230--237",
    journal = "Energy Procedia",
    issn = "1876-6102",
    publisher = "Elsevier",

    }

    Can further energy reductions be achieved through behaviour changes in low income households? / Trombley, Jeremy; Halawa, Edward.

    In: Energy Procedia, Vol. 121, 09.2017, p. 230-237.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Can further energy reductions be achieved through behaviour changes in low income households?

    AU - Trombley, Jeremy

    AU - Halawa, Edward

    PY - 2017/9

    Y1 - 2017/9

    N2 - Smart Cooling in the Tropics (SCIT) was a project whose main goals were to create energy savings and improve human thermal comfort in low income households located in Darwin, Australia. The project was funded through the Australian Government's Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (LIEEP). The attitudes and behaviours of the 476 participants were investigated through a series of surveys. Each participant was allocated a single, focused treatment based on the results from a home energy assessment. The impediments to energy savings were found to be diverse among participants, so having an individualized treatment plan was necessary to ensure it was appropriate for each participant. One particular aspect of the project that is examined here was the energy savings brought about using education to initiate behaviour changes in participants to reduce their electricity usage. The data collected showed that participants were already actively trying to reduce their consumption through common energy-saving practices before joining SCIT, which were the main energy-saving practices proposed through SCIT, and so further significant reductions through behaviour changes were not likely. At the conclusion of the project, over half of the participants identified a range of barriers still preventing them from additional savings and are described herein. The project was successful in improving thermal comfort levels in participating homes, as demonstrated by over 76% of participants saying they felt cooler/more comfortable because of their involvement. Furthermore, it was found that non-energy benefits were valued higher than energy savings, and improvements in comfort were the most identified and highest rated of all benefits.

    AB - Smart Cooling in the Tropics (SCIT) was a project whose main goals were to create energy savings and improve human thermal comfort in low income households located in Darwin, Australia. The project was funded through the Australian Government's Low Income Energy Efficiency Program (LIEEP). The attitudes and behaviours of the 476 participants were investigated through a series of surveys. Each participant was allocated a single, focused treatment based on the results from a home energy assessment. The impediments to energy savings were found to be diverse among participants, so having an individualized treatment plan was necessary to ensure it was appropriate for each participant. One particular aspect of the project that is examined here was the energy savings brought about using education to initiate behaviour changes in participants to reduce their electricity usage. The data collected showed that participants were already actively trying to reduce their consumption through common energy-saving practices before joining SCIT, which were the main energy-saving practices proposed through SCIT, and so further significant reductions through behaviour changes were not likely. At the conclusion of the project, over half of the participants identified a range of barriers still preventing them from additional savings and are described herein. The project was successful in improving thermal comfort levels in participating homes, as demonstrated by over 76% of participants saying they felt cooler/more comfortable because of their involvement. Furthermore, it was found that non-energy benefits were valued higher than energy savings, and improvements in comfort were the most identified and highest rated of all benefits.

    KW - barriers

    KW - behaviour change

    KW - energy

    KW - low income

    KW - non-energy benefits

    KW - tropical

    UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85032004503&partnerID=8YFLogxK

    U2 - 10.1016/j.egypro.2017.08.022

    DO - 10.1016/j.egypro.2017.08.022

    M3 - Article

    VL - 121

    SP - 230

    EP - 237

    JO - Energy Procedia

    JF - Energy Procedia

    SN - 1876-6102

    ER -