Can wearable technology predict pain like pain predicts the weather?

Sam Gleadhill

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in Proceedings

    Abstract

    Measuring risk factors of injury with technology may be possible with inertial sensors. The aim was to highlight inertial sensor capabilities, to propose future research interventions. Student’s T tests were completed for statistical comparisons of gyroscope angular rate of change, between deadlifts completed with a neutral spine posture and a flexed spine posture. It was concluded that inertial sensors can monitor anterior-posterior spine technique differences in resistance exercise. Therefore future research is needed to assess the capability of inertial sensor technology to measure parameters of human movement that reflect the risk of sustaining injuries.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationThe Journal o Fitness Research
    Subtitle of host publicationSpecial Issue ASTN-Q Conference 2016 Research & Innovation in Sports Technology
    EditorsDaniel A James
    Place of PublicationAustralia
    PublisherAustralian Institute of Fitness
    Pages5-7
    Number of pages3
    Volume5
    ISBN (Print)2201-5655
    Publication statusPublished - Aug 2016
    EventASTN-Q Conference 2016 - QLD, Australia
    Duration: 9 Aug 2016 → …
    http://fitnessresearch.edu.au/astn-q

    Conference

    ConferenceASTN-Q Conference 2016
    Period9/08/16 → …
    Internet address

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    Cite this

    Gleadhill, S. (2016). Can wearable technology predict pain like pain predicts the weather? In D. A. James (Ed.), The Journal o Fitness Research: Special Issue ASTN-Q Conference 2016 Research & Innovation in Sports Technology (Vol. 5, pp. 5-7). Australia: Australian Institute of Fitness.