Cancer-related fatigue

A review of nursing interventions

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

Fatigue is a common and distressing symptom that is a concern for cancer patients, their families, carers and health professionals. Cancer-related fatigue is a multidimensional phenomenon that is self-perceived and includes physical, emotional, cognitive and behavioural components. It can be unrelenting, disrupts daily life, fosters helplessness and may culminate in despair. The many causes of cancer-related fatigue stem from the disease itself, the cancer treatments and their side effects. The conclusion from a recent critical review of research evidence is that physical exercise and the treatment of underlying problems, such as anaemia or clinical depression, are effective interventions. However, a wide range of practical interventions and complementary therapies are likely to be helpful such as: acupressure and acupuncture, stress management and relaxation, energy conservation measures, anticipatory guidance and preparatory information, and attention-restoring activities. This article will provide a comprehensive review of current knowledge surrounding cancer-related fatigue and the nursing interventions that can be implemented in community practice.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)214-219
Number of pages6
JournalBritish Journal of Community Nursing
Volume15
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2010
Externally publishedYes

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Fatigue
Nursing
Neoplasms
Acupressure
Family Health
Acupuncture
Complementary Therapies
Caregivers
Anemia
Exercise
Therapeutics
Research

Cite this

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Cancer-related fatigue : A review of nursing interventions. / Kirshbaum, M.

In: British Journal of Community Nursing, Vol. 15, No. 5, 01.05.2010, p. 214-219.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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