Capillary and mitochondrial unit in muscles of a large lizard

K.E. Conley, K.A. Christian, H. Hoppeler, E.R. Weibel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

Abstract

We asked whether capillaries and mitochondria form a structural and functional unit in the musculature of the Cuban iguana (Cyclura nubila) similar to that found in mammals. We found a significant correlation between capillary length density [J(V)(c,f)] and mitochondrial volume density [V(V)(mt,f)] of the musculature with a slope that revealed that on average 3.5 km of capillaries were associated with each milliliter of mitochondria (vs. ~ 11 km/ml in mammals). These capillaries had a diameter of 9 μm (vs. 4.5 μm in mammals), and the mitochondria had a surface density of the inner membranes of 25 m2/ml (vs. 30-45 m2/ml in mammals). These dimensions resulted in ratios of capillary to mitochondrial volume (0.22 ml/ml) and capillary wall to mitochondrial membrane surface area (39 cm2/m2) that were similar in Cyclura to those found in mammals (~ 0.18 ml/ml and 35-52 cm2/m2, respectively). Also in agreement with mammalian values were the average oxidative capacity of the mitochondria derived from maximum rate of O2 consumption (V̇O2(max)) during exercise at 37°C and the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area [S(im)] of the musculature [V̇O2(max)/S(im) = 0.04 vs. 0.06-0.15 ml O2 · m-2 · min-1 in mammals]. These common structural and functional relationships support the notion that capillaries and mitochondria represent a similar fundamental unit in muscles of both Cyclura and mammals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)R982-988
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology
Volume256
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1989
Externally publishedYes

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Lizards
Mammals
Muscles
Mitochondria
Mitochondrial Size
Mitochondrial Membranes
Iguanas
Membranes

Cite this

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title = "Capillary and mitochondrial unit in muscles of a large lizard",
abstract = "We asked whether capillaries and mitochondria form a structural and functional unit in the musculature of the Cuban iguana (Cyclura nubila) similar to that found in mammals. We found a significant correlation between capillary length density [J(V)(c,f)] and mitochondrial volume density [V(V)(mt,f)] of the musculature with a slope that revealed that on average 3.5 km of capillaries were associated with each milliliter of mitochondria (vs. ~ 11 km/ml in mammals). These capillaries had a diameter of 9 μm (vs. 4.5 μm in mammals), and the mitochondria had a surface density of the inner membranes of 25 m2/ml (vs. 30-45 m2/ml in mammals). These dimensions resulted in ratios of capillary to mitochondrial volume (0.22 ml/ml) and capillary wall to mitochondrial membrane surface area (39 cm2/m2) that were similar in Cyclura to those found in mammals (~ 0.18 ml/ml and 35-52 cm2/m2, respectively). Also in agreement with mammalian values were the average oxidative capacity of the mitochondria derived from maximum rate of O2 consumption (V̇O2(max)) during exercise at 37°C and the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area [S(im)] of the musculature [V̇O2(max)/S(im) = 0.04 vs. 0.06-0.15 ml O2 · m-2 · min-1 in mammals]. These common structural and functional relationships support the notion that capillaries and mitochondria represent a similar fundamental unit in muscles of both Cyclura and mammals.",
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Capillary and mitochondrial unit in muscles of a large lizard. / Conley, K.E.; Christian, K.A.; Hoppeler, H.; Weibel, E.R.

In: American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology, Vol. 256, No. 4, 1989, p. R982-988.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Capillary and mitochondrial unit in muscles of a large lizard

AU - Conley, K.E.

AU - Christian, K.A.

AU - Hoppeler, H.

AU - Weibel, E.R.

PY - 1989

Y1 - 1989

N2 - We asked whether capillaries and mitochondria form a structural and functional unit in the musculature of the Cuban iguana (Cyclura nubila) similar to that found in mammals. We found a significant correlation between capillary length density [J(V)(c,f)] and mitochondrial volume density [V(V)(mt,f)] of the musculature with a slope that revealed that on average 3.5 km of capillaries were associated with each milliliter of mitochondria (vs. ~ 11 km/ml in mammals). These capillaries had a diameter of 9 μm (vs. 4.5 μm in mammals), and the mitochondria had a surface density of the inner membranes of 25 m2/ml (vs. 30-45 m2/ml in mammals). These dimensions resulted in ratios of capillary to mitochondrial volume (0.22 ml/ml) and capillary wall to mitochondrial membrane surface area (39 cm2/m2) that were similar in Cyclura to those found in mammals (~ 0.18 ml/ml and 35-52 cm2/m2, respectively). Also in agreement with mammalian values were the average oxidative capacity of the mitochondria derived from maximum rate of O2 consumption (V̇O2(max)) during exercise at 37°C and the inner mitochondrial membrane surface area [S(im)] of the musculature [V̇O2(max)/S(im) = 0.04 vs. 0.06-0.15 ml O2 · m-2 · min-1 in mammals]. These common structural and functional relationships support the notion that capillaries and mitochondria represent a similar fundamental unit in muscles of both Cyclura and mammals.

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KW - capillary

KW - controlled study

KW - cytology

KW - female

KW - forced inspiratory volume

KW - histology

KW - lizard

KW - mitochondrion

KW - muscle

KW - nonhuman

KW - priority journal

KW - reptile

KW - ultrastructure, Animal

KW - Capillaries

KW - Exertion

KW - Female

KW - Iguanas

KW - Lizards

KW - Microscopy, Electron

KW - Mitochondria, Muscle

KW - Muscles

KW - Oxygen Consumption

KW - Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

KW - Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.

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DO - 10.1152/ajpregu.1989.256.4.R982

M3 - Article

VL - 256

SP - R982-988

JO - American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

JF - American Journal of Physiology: Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology

SN - 0363-6119

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