Child and adolescent refugees and asylum seekers in Australia: the ethics of exposing children to suffering to achieve social outcomes

Sarah Mares, Jon Jureidini

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Sarah Mares and Jon Jureidini review the impact of harsh policies of deterrence, and in particular indefinite mandatory detention, on asylum seekers including children arriving in Australia from 2000 until late 2007. They consider the ethical and human rights implications of policies which wilfully exposed children to abuse and neglect and negative developmental and mental health outcomes. They undertake an examination of various consequentialist arguments that seek to justify indefinite mandatory detention or contest it. They also consider the ethical demands on health professionals who assess and attempt to treat children and their families who are harmed by immigration policy and practice.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationMental Health and Human Rights Vision, praxis, and courage
    EditorsMichael Dudley, Derrick Silove, Fran Gale
    Place of PublicationOxford
    PublisherOxford University Press
    Chapter20
    Pages403-414
    Number of pages12
    ISBN (Print)978-0-19-921396-2
    Publication statusPublished - 2012

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  • Cite this

    Mares, S., & Jureidini, J. (2012). Child and adolescent refugees and asylum seekers in Australia: the ethics of exposing children to suffering to achieve social outcomes. In M. Dudley, D. Silove, & F. Gale (Eds.), Mental Health and Human Rights Vision, praxis, and courage (pp. 403-414). Oxford University Press.