Cognition and nocturnal disturbance in OSA

the importance of accounting for age and premorbid intelligence

Michelle Olaithe, Timothy Skinner, David Hillman, Peter Eastwood, Romola Bucks

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that is associated with impaired attention, memory and executive function. However, the mechanisms underlying such dysfunction are unclear. To determine the influence of sleep fragmentation and hypoxia, this study examined the effect of sleep fragmentation and hypoxia on cognition in OSA, while controlling for potentially confounding variables including sleepiness, age and premorbid intelligence.

    Method: 
    Participants with and without OSA (N = 150) were recruited from the general community and a tertiary hospital sleep clinic. All underwent comprehensive, laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) and completed assessments of cognition including attention, short- and long-term memory and executive function. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to construct a theoretically-driven model to examine the relationships between hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, and cognitive function.

    Results: 
    Although after controlling for IQ, increased sleep disturbance was a significant predictor of decreased attention (p = 0.04) and decreased executive function (p = 0.05), controlling for age removes these significant relationships. No significant predictors of memory function were found.

    Conclusions: 
    The mechanisms underlying the effects of OSA on cognition remain to be defined. Implications are discussed in light of these findings.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)221-230
    Number of pages10
    JournalSleep and Breathing
    Volume19
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Mar 2015

    Fingerprint

    Obstructive Sleep Apnea
    Intelligence
    Cognition
    Sleep Deprivation
    Executive Function
    Sleep
    Confounding Factors (Epidemiology)
    Long-Term Memory
    Polysomnography
    Tertiary Care Centers
    Hypoxia

    Cite this

    Olaithe, Michelle ; Skinner, Timothy ; Hillman, David ; Eastwood, Peter ; Bucks, Romola. / Cognition and nocturnal disturbance in OSA : the importance of accounting for age and premorbid intelligence. In: Sleep and Breathing. 2015 ; Vol. 19, No. 1. pp. 221-230.
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    abstract = "Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that is associated with impaired attention, memory and executive function. However, the mechanisms underlying such dysfunction are unclear. To determine the influence of sleep fragmentation and hypoxia, this study examined the effect of sleep fragmentation and hypoxia on cognition in OSA, while controlling for potentially confounding variables including sleepiness, age and premorbid intelligence.Method: Participants with and without OSA (N = 150) were recruited from the general community and a tertiary hospital sleep clinic. All underwent comprehensive, laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) and completed assessments of cognition including attention, short- and long-term memory and executive function. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to construct a theoretically-driven model to examine the relationships between hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, and cognitive function.Results: Although after controlling for IQ, increased sleep disturbance was a significant predictor of decreased attention (p = 0.04) and decreased executive function (p = 0.05), controlling for age removes these significant relationships. No significant predictors of memory function were found.Conclusions: The mechanisms underlying the effects of OSA on cognition remain to be defined. Implications are discussed in light of these findings.",
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    Cognition and nocturnal disturbance in OSA : the importance of accounting for age and premorbid intelligence. / Olaithe, Michelle; Skinner, Timothy; Hillman, David; Eastwood, Peter; Bucks, Romola.

    In: Sleep and Breathing, Vol. 19, No. 1, 03.2015, p. 221-230.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T2 - the importance of accounting for age and premorbid intelligence

    AU - Olaithe, Michelle

    AU - Skinner, Timothy

    AU - Hillman, David

    AU - Eastwood, Peter

    AU - Bucks, Romola

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    N2 - Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a common disorder that is associated with impaired attention, memory and executive function. However, the mechanisms underlying such dysfunction are unclear. To determine the influence of sleep fragmentation and hypoxia, this study examined the effect of sleep fragmentation and hypoxia on cognition in OSA, while controlling for potentially confounding variables including sleepiness, age and premorbid intelligence.Method: Participants with and without OSA (N = 150) were recruited from the general community and a tertiary hospital sleep clinic. All underwent comprehensive, laboratory-based polysomnography (PSG) and completed assessments of cognition including attention, short- and long-term memory and executive function. Structural equation modelling (SEM) was used to construct a theoretically-driven model to examine the relationships between hypoxia and sleep fragmentation, and cognitive function.Results: Although after controlling for IQ, increased sleep disturbance was a significant predictor of decreased attention (p = 0.04) and decreased executive function (p = 0.05), controlling for age removes these significant relationships. No significant predictors of memory function were found.Conclusions: The mechanisms underlying the effects of OSA on cognition remain to be defined. Implications are discussed in light of these findings.

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