Collaborative professional partnerships for speech pathology practice and research in Australia: a bibliographic analysis on publications in the new millennium

Hamid Karimi, Alireza Ahmadvand

Research output: Contribution to conferenceConference paper presented at Conference (not in Proceedings)peer-review

Abstract

Background
Bibliographic analysis, the detailed evaluation of written publications, has been performed across a range of biomedical disciplines. Regular analyses can provide meaningful information to guide clinical training and research.
Aims:
We aimed to provide a theme-based, longitudinal bibliographic analysis of speech pathology research publications from Australia in recent 20 years.

Methods:
We performed a retrospective bibliographic analysis on publications indexed in PubMed between January 2000 and August 2020. We included those publications in which at least one co-author from Australia had an affiliation from the departments or research organisations related to speech pathology. All types of articles focusing on various aspects of the field were audited. The abstracts of the publications identified were analysed for their publishing journals, article themes, subject focus, research design, and content.

Results:
A total of 2143 article abstracts were analyzed, published in 531 journals. The means number of publications indexed in PubMed increased significantly from 27 publications per year in the first decade of the 21st century to 182 publication in the second decade. Most of the studies have been on adult participants (47%) followed by studies on children (20.1%), elderly (17.6%), adolescents (12.6%) and infants (2.2%). International Journal of Speech and Language Pathology, the official journal of Speech Pathology Australia, hosted most of the publications (9.5%). Of the 5,315 keywords/subjects examined, fluency, swallowing, developmental language, and voice were the most common subjects of the publications. The key study designs used were RCT (50), cohort study (128), Case-control study (73), and Cross-sectional study (103). Systematic reviews (18) and meta-analysis (15) made up a valuable but smaller proportion of the overall research output.

Discussion:
Collaborative professional partnerships for speech pathology practice and research in Australia will be discussed in more detail regarding the focus of previous studies pertain to different range of practices and for various generic professional competencies. Also, the current publication gaps to meet Speech Pathology Australia 2030 vision will be discussed.

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusUnpublished - 2021
EventSpeech Pathology Australia National Conference -
Duration: 1 Jan 2011 → …

Conference

ConferenceSpeech Pathology Australia National Conference
Period1/01/11 → …

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