Consensus Building or Constructive Conflict? Aboriginal Discursive Strategies to Enhance Participation in Natural resource Management in Australia and Canada

Kristen Maclean, Catherine Robinson, David Natcher

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    Abstract

    This article analyzes the strategies used by the Girringun Aboriginal Corporation from the Wet Tropics, Australia, and the Innu Nation of Labrador, Canada, in their efforts to participate in natural resource management within their traditional lands. Comparative research highlights that both Aboriginal groups engage in strategies of consensus building and constructive conflict, matching their choice to the dynamic institutional settings that govern natural resource management in their respective territories. Both groups build consensus for more equitable participation in natural resource management institutions while engaging, when necessary, in forms of constructive conflict that will bring about more expedient institutional change needed to fully reflect the full suite of Aboriginal interests and values. The result is a mix of Aboriginal strategies that are used to instigate planning reforms on their traditional estates.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)197-211
    Number of pages15
    JournalSociety and Natural Resources
    Volume28
    Issue number2
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Feb 2015

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    natural resources
    resource management
    natural resource
    Canada
    participation
    management
    tropics
    comparative research
    institutional change
    corporation
    Group
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    planning
    conflict
    Values
    land

    Cite this

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    Consensus Building or Constructive Conflict? Aboriginal Discursive Strategies to Enhance Participation in Natural resource Management in Australia and Canada. / Maclean, Kristen; Robinson, Catherine; Natcher, David.

    In: Society and Natural Resources, Vol. 28, No. 2, 01.02.2015, p. 197-211.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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