Critical incident stress management

A review of the literature with implications for social work

Margaret Jane Pack

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    This article describes the debates in the research literature surrounding the provision of critical incident stress management (CISM) and outlines the implications for social work. The literature reviewed suggests that critical incident stress debriefing (CISD) as an intervention needs to be offered as part of a comprehensive programme of critical incident stress management that is integrated and sensitive to the organizational context. Strengths-based principles need to underpin an integrated critical incident stress management policy that is sensitive to differences in individual responses, organizational contexts and diverse fields of social work practice. Adaptations of Mitchell's original model of critical incident stress management which aim at mitigating the potential negative impact of critical incidents encountered in the workplace whilst enhancing personal resilience are discussed with reference to recent critiques of this model. 

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)608-627
    Number of pages20
    JournalInternational Social Work
    Volume56
    Issue number5
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2013

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    stress management
    incident
    social work
    resilience
    literature
    workplace

    Cite this

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    Critical incident stress management : A review of the literature with implications for social work. / Pack, Margaret Jane.

    In: International Social Work, Vol. 56, No. 5, 01.09.2013, p. 608-627.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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