Deconstructing Africa's Urban Space: Sustainable Development and Spatial Planning Challenge

Patrick Brandful Cobbinah, Michael Odei Erdiaw-Kwasie, Marita Basson

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterpeer-review

Abstract

In this chapter, an analysis of the relationship between sustainable development and spatial planning, and how that shapes the urban space is presented. While the literature is replete with sustainable development and spatial planning research, little is known about the link between these two distinct but interrelated concepts, and how this relationship is unfolding in the production of the urban space in regions experiencing rapid urban growth, especially Africa. This chapter begins with an exploration of the emerged and the emerging notions of sustainable development and spatial planning with an African focus, and further reviews the theoretical foundation and empirical evidence at the interface of regional and national scales. Findings show a positive theoretical and strong complementary relationship between sustainable development and spatial planning, both normative and distributive aims. However, their manifestation in the production of the urban space in Africa is characterised by poor local content due to, inter alia, limited state agency commitment, colonial legacy impediments and the influence and agenda of international organisations. Recommendations to improve this relationship in urban Africa are proffered.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationSustainable Urban Futures in Africa
EditorsPatrick Brandful Cobbinah, Michael Addaney
Place of PublicationUK
PublisherRoutledge Taylor & Francis Group
Chapter2
Pages21-41
Number of pages21
Edition1
ISBN (Electronic)9781003181484
ISBN (Print)9781032020167, 9781032020181
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2022

Publication series

NameRoutledge Research in Planning and Urban Design
PublisherRoutledge

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