Developing methods for quantifying the apparent abundance of fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae: Uca) in mangrove habitats

Madeliene Nobbs, Keith Mcguinness

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Counting the number of individuals emerging from burrows is the most practical method for estimating the apparent abundance of Australian Uca species living in mangrove habitats. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect on counts of quadrat design, distance of observer, quadrat size, recovery time and observational technique. Significant differences in the apparent abundance of one species were found when the subjects were within 2 m of the observer, and when a conspicuous quadrat was used. The largest quadrat tested provided the least variability in counts but an intermediate size (0.56 m2) was more practical. Most Uca active within a 30-min period emerged during the first 10 min regardless of site, species, sex or season, There was a linear correlation between scanning and continuous observation indicating that the former method could be useful when sampling time was limited. Temporal changes in the apparent abundance of Uca suggest that long-term sampling and more detailed studies will be worthwhile.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)43-49
    Number of pages7
    JournalAustral Ecology
    Volume24
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Feb 1999

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    mangrove
    crab
    crabs
    habitat
    habitats
    sampling
    burrow
    burrows
    methodology
    gender
    method
    Ocypodidae
    Uca
    experiment
    effect

    Cite this

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    title = "Developing methods for quantifying the apparent abundance of fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae: Uca) in mangrove habitats",
    abstract = "Counting the number of individuals emerging from burrows is the most practical method for estimating the apparent abundance of Australian Uca species living in mangrove habitats. Experiments were conducted to investigate the effect on counts of quadrat design, distance of observer, quadrat size, recovery time and observational technique. Significant differences in the apparent abundance of one species were found when the subjects were within 2 m of the observer, and when a conspicuous quadrat was used. The largest quadrat tested provided the least variability in counts but an intermediate size (0.56 m2) was more practical. Most Uca active within a 30-min period emerged during the first 10 min regardless of site, species, sex or season, There was a linear correlation between scanning and continuous observation indicating that the former method could be useful when sampling time was limited. Temporal changes in the apparent abundance of Uca suggest that long-term sampling and more detailed studies will be worthwhile.",
    author = "Madeliene Nobbs and Keith Mcguinness",
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    language = "English",
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    Developing methods for quantifying the apparent abundance of fiddler crabs (Ocypodidae: Uca) in mangrove habitats. / Nobbs, Madeliene; Mcguinness, Keith.

    In: Austral Ecology, Vol. 24, No. 1, 02.1999, p. 43-49.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    AU - Mcguinness, Keith

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