Differential Effects of Pandemic(H1N1) 2009 on Remote andIndigenous Groups, NorthernTerritory, Australia, 2009

James McCracken Trauer, Karen Laurie, Joseph Mcdonnell, Anne Kelso, Peter Markey

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Abstract

Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza spread through the Northern Territory, Australia, during June-August 2009. We performed 2 cross-sectional serologic surveys on specimens from Northern Territory residents, with 445 specimens obtained prepandemic and 1,689 specimens postpandemic. Antibody titers were determined by hemagglutination inhibition against reference virus A/California/7/2009 on serum samples collected opportunistically from outpatients. All specimens had data for patients' gender, age, and address, with patients' indigenous status determined for 94.1%. Protective immunity (titer >40) was present in 7.6% (95% confi dence interval [CI] 5.2%-10.1%) of prepandemic specimens and 19.5% (95% CI 17.6%-21.4%) of postpandemic specimens, giving a population-standardized attack rate of 14.9% (95% CI 11.0%-18.9%). Prepandemic proportion of immune persons was greater with increasing age but did not differ by other demographic characteristics. Postpandemic proportion of immune persons was greater in younger groups and around double in indigenous persons. Postpandemic proportion immune was geographically heterogeneous, particularly among remote-living and indigenous groups.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1615-1623
Number of pages9
JournalEmerging Infectious Diseases
Volume17
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011

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Pandemics
Northern Territory
California Encephalitis Viruses
Hemagglutination
Human Influenza
Immunity
Outpatients
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Antibodies
Serum
Population

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McCracken Trauer, James ; Laurie, Karen ; Mcdonnell, Joseph ; Kelso, Anne ; Markey, Peter. / Differential Effects of Pandemic(H1N1) 2009 on Remote andIndigenous Groups, NorthernTerritory, Australia, 2009. In: Emerging Infectious Diseases. 2011 ; Vol. 17, No. 9. pp. 1615-1623.
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abstract = "Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 influenza spread through the Northern Territory, Australia, during June-August 2009. We performed 2 cross-sectional serologic surveys on specimens from Northern Territory residents, with 445 specimens obtained prepandemic and 1,689 specimens postpandemic. Antibody titers were determined by hemagglutination inhibition against reference virus A/California/7/2009 on serum samples collected opportunistically from outpatients. All specimens had data for patients' gender, age, and address, with patients' indigenous status determined for 94.1{\%}. Protective immunity (titer >40) was present in 7.6{\%} (95{\%} confi dence interval [CI] 5.2{\%}-10.1{\%}) of prepandemic specimens and 19.5{\%} (95{\%} CI 17.6{\%}-21.4{\%}) of postpandemic specimens, giving a population-standardized attack rate of 14.9{\%} (95{\%} CI 11.0{\%}-18.9{\%}). Prepandemic proportion of immune persons was greater with increasing age but did not differ by other demographic characteristics. Postpandemic proportion of immune persons was greater in younger groups and around double in indigenous persons. Postpandemic proportion immune was geographically heterogeneous, particularly among remote-living and indigenous groups.",
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Differential Effects of Pandemic(H1N1) 2009 on Remote andIndigenous Groups, NorthernTerritory, Australia, 2009. / McCracken Trauer, James; Laurie, Karen; Mcdonnell, Joseph; Kelso, Anne; Markey, Peter.

In: Emerging Infectious Diseases, Vol. 17, No. 9, 2011, p. 1615-1623.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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