Digital storytelling as student-centred pedagogy: empowering high school students to frame their futures

Brenda Staley, Leonard Freeman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    Abstract

    Digital storytelling was used in a high school classroom in the Midwestern
    USA as a part of the curriculum for “non-university-bound” rural youth.
    Though described as “unengaged”, in this paper we illustrate the way this
    digital storytelling project redefined the teacher-student power relationship, and students responded by producing work that was opinionated, forceful and demonstrated a thorough engagement with academic practices via technologies.

    Research demonstrates that teacher expectations impact student outcomes, and for marginalised students, it is essential to provide pedagogical opportunities that affirm the student’s culture and identity. In this paper, we describe the project and the ways students talked about their education and their future through their digital stories. We use Smyth’s (International Journal of Leadership in Education 9(4):285–298, 2006) learner-centred policy constellation to consider the findings, and reframe the way we view these students and their work.

    By utilising technologies in a meaningful way in the classroom, we anticipate educators can potentially deliver more effective, powerful and engaging pedagogies to all students, including those on nonmainstream educational pathways.
    Original languageEnglish
    Article number21
    Pages (from-to)1-17
    Number of pages17
    JournalResearch and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning
    Volume12
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 2017

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    Teaching
    Students
    school
    student
    Education
    classroom
    Technology
    High school students
    Storytelling
    Pedagogy
    student teacher
    education
    Curriculum
    Curricula
    educator
    leadership
    curriculum
    teacher
    Research
    Pathway

    Cite this

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    title = "Digital storytelling as student-centred pedagogy: empowering high school students to frame their futures",
    abstract = "Digital storytelling was used in a high school classroom in the Midwestern USA as a part of the curriculum for “non-university-bound” rural youth. Though described as “unengaged”, in this paper we illustrate the way this digital storytelling project redefined the teacher-student power relationship, and students responded by producing work that was opinionated, forceful and demonstrated a thorough engagement with academic practices via technologies.Research demonstrates that teacher expectations impact student outcomes, and for marginalised students, it is essential to provide pedagogical opportunities that affirm the student’s culture and identity. In this paper, we describe the project and the ways students talked about their education and their future through their digital stories. We use Smyth’s (International Journal of Leadership in Education 9(4):285–298, 2006) learner-centred policy constellation to consider the findings, and reframe the way we view these students and their work. By utilising technologies in a meaningful way in the classroom, we anticipate educators can potentially deliver more effective, powerful and engaging pedagogies to all students, including those on nonmainstream educational pathways.",
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    Digital storytelling as student-centred pedagogy: empowering high school students to frame their futures. / Staley, Brenda; Freeman, Leonard.

    In: Research and Practice in Technology Enhanced Learning, Vol. 12, 21, 2017, p. 1-17.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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