Do not pass go, do not collect $200 - the priority given to Vocational Education and Training research and policy

Don Zoellner

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    In order to understand how Vocational Education and Training (VET) research may be used in the policy making process of state and territory governments in Australia, it is necessary to examine the competing priorities that demand the attention of the decision makers. While the public VET system has a long record of skills development for individuals who are deemed to be disadvantaged, there are other institutions and organisations that have an emerging interest in the same groups. The provocative analysis provided by Wacquant on the notion of 'prisonfare' proposes that justice systems have been given a new role in economic society - to control those people that inhabit the bottom of the socio-economic ladder. This paper will analyse one Australian jurisdiction's relative priority given to the resource allocation made to justice initiatives compared with VET over time in order to see which of these two policy areas has assumed dominance in government decision making. This can then serve as a guide to VET researchers as to the types of knowledge required to best position VET in the arena of competing policy interests.

    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationAVETRA Conference 2012 Papers
    Place of PublicationCanberra
    PublisherAustralian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA)
    Pages1-10
    Number of pages10
    ISBN (Print)978-0-980275-3-7
    Publication statusPublished - 2012
    EventAustralian Vocational Education and Training Research Association 15th Annual Conference - Canberra
    Duration: 11 Apr 201213 Apr 2012

    Conference

    ConferenceAustralian Vocational Education and Training Research Association 15th Annual Conference
    Period11/04/1213/04/12

    Fingerprint

    vocational education
    Vocational Education
    justice
    vocational training system
    system of vocational education
    overtime
    policy area
    economics
    jurisdiction
    decision making
    demand
    resources
    Group

    Cite this

    Zoellner, D. (2012). Do not pass go, do not collect $200 - the priority given to Vocational Education and Training research and policy. In AVETRA Conference 2012 Papers (pp. 1-10). Canberra: Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA).
    Zoellner, Don. / Do not pass go, do not collect $200 - the priority given to Vocational Education and Training research and policy. AVETRA Conference 2012 Papers. Canberra : Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA), 2012. pp. 1-10
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    abstract = "In order to understand how Vocational Education and Training (VET) research may be used in the policy making process of state and territory governments in Australia, it is necessary to examine the competing priorities that demand the attention of the decision makers. While the public VET system has a long record of skills development for individuals who are deemed to be disadvantaged, there are other institutions and organisations that have an emerging interest in the same groups. The provocative analysis provided by Wacquant on the notion of 'prisonfare' proposes that justice systems have been given a new role in economic society - to control those people that inhabit the bottom of the socio-economic ladder. This paper will analyse one Australian jurisdiction's relative priority given to the resource allocation made to justice initiatives compared with VET over time in order to see which of these two policy areas has assumed dominance in government decision making. This can then serve as a guide to VET researchers as to the types of knowledge required to best position VET in the arena of competing policy interests.",
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    Zoellner, D 2012, Do not pass go, do not collect $200 - the priority given to Vocational Education and Training research and policy. in AVETRA Conference 2012 Papers. Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA), Canberra, pp. 1-10, Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association 15th Annual Conference, 11/04/12.

    Do not pass go, do not collect $200 - the priority given to Vocational Education and Training research and policy. / Zoellner, Don.

    AVETRA Conference 2012 Papers. Canberra : Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA), 2012. p. 1-10.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

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    Zoellner D. Do not pass go, do not collect $200 - the priority given to Vocational Education and Training research and policy. In AVETRA Conference 2012 Papers. Canberra: Australian Vocational Education and Training Research Association (AVETRA). 2012. p. 1-10