Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?

Wayne Erskine, Mike Saynor, K Turner, Timothy Whiteside, James Matthew Boyden, Kenneth Evans

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationSediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea
    Subtitle of host publicationProceedings of a symposium held at New Orleans, USA, 11–14 December 2014
    EditorsY Jun Xu, MA Allison, SJ Bentley, AL Collins, WD Erskine, V Goloso
    Place of PublicationWallingford, UK
    PublisherIAHS Press
    Pages283-290
    Number of pages8
    Volume367
    ISBN (Print)978-1-907161-4-52
    Publication statusPublished - 2014
    EventInternational Symposium On Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea (ICCE) 2014 - New Orleans, USA
    Duration: 11 Dec 201414 Dec 2014

    Conference

    ConferenceInternational Symposium On Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea (ICCE) 2014
    Period11/12/1414/12/14

    Fingerprint

    sediment yield
    bedload
    suspended sediment
    erosion rate
    schist
    soil erosion
    wetland
    sand
    mica
    rock
    sediment
    chlorite
    sediment transport
    trapping
    uranium
    silt
    weathering
    clay
    basin
    sea

    Cite this

    Erskine, W., Saynor, M., Turner, K., Whiteside, T., Boyden, J. M., & Evans, K. (2014). Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia? In Y. J. Xu, MA. Allison, SJ. Bentley, AL. Collins, WD. Erskine, & V. Goloso (Eds.), Sediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea: Proceedings of a symposium held at New Orleans, USA, 11–14 December 2014 (Vol. 367, pp. 283-290). Wallingford, UK: IAHS Press.
    Erskine, Wayne ; Saynor, Mike ; Turner, K ; Whiteside, Timothy ; Boyden, James Matthew ; Evans, Kenneth. / Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?. Sediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea: Proceedings of a symposium held at New Orleans, USA, 11–14 December 2014. editor / Y Jun Xu ; MA Allison ; SJ Bentley ; AL Collins ; WD Erskine ; V Goloso. Vol. 367 Wallingford, UK : IAHS Press, 2014. pp. 283-290
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    title = "Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia?",
    abstract = "Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5{\%} of the total sediment load input.",
    keywords = "Budget control, Erosion, Floods, Mica, Radioactive wastes, Rivers, Sediment transport, Sediments, Silicate minerals, Turbidity, Weathering, Wetlands, Natural sediments, Northern Australia, Sediment budgets, Sediment trapping, Sediment yields, Soil erosion rate, Suspended sediment yields, Total sediment loads, Suspended sediments",
    author = "Wayne Erskine and Mike Saynor and K Turner and Timothy Whiteside and Boyden, {James Matthew} and Kenneth Evans",
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    Erskine, W, Saynor, M, Turner, K, Whiteside, T, Boyden, JM & Evans, K 2014, Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia? in YJ Xu, MA Allison, SJ Bentley, AL Collins, WD Erskine & V Goloso (eds), Sediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea: Proceedings of a symposium held at New Orleans, USA, 11–14 December 2014. vol. 367, IAHS Press, Wallingford, UK, pp. 283-290, International Symposium On Sediment Dynamics: From the Summit to the Sea (ICCE) 2014, 11/12/14.

    Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia? / Erskine, Wayne; Saynor, Mike; Turner, K; Whiteside, Timothy; Boyden, James Matthew; Evans, Kenneth.

    Sediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea: Proceedings of a symposium held at New Orleans, USA, 11–14 December 2014. ed. / Y Jun Xu; MA Allison; SJ Bentley; AL Collins; WD Erskine; V Goloso. Vol. 367 Wallingford, UK : IAHS Press, 2014. p. 283-290.

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Paper published in ProceedingsResearchpeer-review

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    N2 - Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.

    AB - Soil erosion rates on plots of waste rock at Ranger uranium mine and basin sediment yields have been measured for over 30 years in Magela Creek in northern Australia. Soil erosion rates on chlorite schist waste rock are higher than for mica schist and weathering is also much faster. Sediment yields are low but are further reduced by sediment trapping effects of flood plains, floodouts, billabongs and extensive wetlands. Suspended sediment yields exceed bedload yields in this deeply weathered, tropical landscape, but the amount of sand transported greatly exceeds that of silt and clay. Nevertheless, sand is totally stored above the topographic base level. Longitudinal continuity of sediment transport is not maintained. As a result, suspended sediment and bedload do not move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek and lower Magela Creek wetlands trap about 90.5% of the total sediment load input.

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    KW - Suspended sediments

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    A2 - Allison, MA

    A2 - Bentley, SJ

    A2 - Collins, AL

    A2 - Erskine, WD

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    PB - IAHS Press

    CY - Wallingford, UK

    ER -

    Erskine W, Saynor M, Turner K, Whiteside T, Boyden JM, Evans K. Do suspended sediment and bedload move progressively from the summit to the sea along Magela Creek, northern Australia? In Xu YJ, Allison MA, Bentley SJ, Collins AL, Erskine WD, Goloso V, editors, Sediment Dynamics from the Summit to the Sea: Proceedings of a symposium held at New Orleans, USA, 11–14 December 2014. Vol. 367. Wallingford, UK: IAHS Press. 2014. p. 283-290