Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities?

Julie Brimblecombe, D Mackerras, P Clifford, Kerin O'Dea

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: To consider the application of the store-turnover method as a guide to assess food intake in remote Aboriginal communities. Method: Food sources in a remote Aboriginal island community were documented. The contribution of quantifiable food sources to total community-level fresh fruit and vegetable availability was determined. Results: The store remains the single largest supplier of fruit and vegetables overall (54%), however its contribution varies depending on the subpopulation of interest. A store-turnover alone may significantly underestimate community-level dietary intake, depending on the contribution of other food sources. Conclusions: Changes in the food supply in remote communities, coupled with methodological complexities inherent in the store-turnover method, challenge its application in a contemporary context. Implications: A simplified version of the store-turnover method is needed that could be widely applied by community people and health practitioners seeking to initiate and monitor interventions to improve diet quality.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)444-447
    Number of pages4
    JournalAustralian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health
    Volume30
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - 2006

    Fingerprint

    Eating
    Food
    Vegetables
    Fruit
    Food Supply
    Islands
    Diet
    Health

    Cite this

    Brimblecombe, Julie ; Mackerras, D ; Clifford, P ; O'Dea, Kerin. / Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities?. In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health. 2006 ; Vol. 30, No. 5. pp. 444-447.
    @article{f612e12ba1184217a615f6f59b1a7a0f,
    title = "Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities?",
    abstract = "Objective: To consider the application of the store-turnover method as a guide to assess food intake in remote Aboriginal communities. Method: Food sources in a remote Aboriginal island community were documented. The contribution of quantifiable food sources to total community-level fresh fruit and vegetable availability was determined. Results: The store remains the single largest supplier of fruit and vegetables overall (54{\%}), however its contribution varies depending on the subpopulation of interest. A store-turnover alone may significantly underestimate community-level dietary intake, depending on the contribution of other food sources. Conclusions: Changes in the food supply in remote communities, coupled with methodological complexities inherent in the store-turnover method, challenge its application in a contemporary context. Implications: A simplified version of the store-turnover method is needed that could be widely applied by community people and health practitioners seeking to initiate and monitor interventions to improve diet quality.",
    keywords = "Aborigine, analytic method, article, catering service, community care, food availability, food intake, food quality, fruit, health practitioner, human, nutritional assessment, vegetable, Eating, Food Industry, Food Supply, Fruit, Humans, Medically Underserved Area, Northern Territory, Oceanic Ancestry Group, Residence Characteristics, Vegetables",
    author = "Julie Brimblecombe and D Mackerras and P Clifford and Kerin O'Dea",
    year = "2006",
    language = "English",
    volume = "30",
    pages = "444--447",
    journal = "Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health",
    issn = "1326-0200",
    publisher = "Public Health Association of Australia",
    number = "5",

    }

    Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities? / Brimblecombe, Julie; Mackerras, D; Clifford, P; O'Dea, Kerin.

    In: Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, Vol. 30, No. 5, 2006, p. 444-447.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Does the store-turnover method still provide a useful guide to food intakes in aboriginal communities?

    AU - Brimblecombe, Julie

    AU - Mackerras, D

    AU - Clifford, P

    AU - O'Dea, Kerin

    PY - 2006

    Y1 - 2006

    N2 - Objective: To consider the application of the store-turnover method as a guide to assess food intake in remote Aboriginal communities. Method: Food sources in a remote Aboriginal island community were documented. The contribution of quantifiable food sources to total community-level fresh fruit and vegetable availability was determined. Results: The store remains the single largest supplier of fruit and vegetables overall (54%), however its contribution varies depending on the subpopulation of interest. A store-turnover alone may significantly underestimate community-level dietary intake, depending on the contribution of other food sources. Conclusions: Changes in the food supply in remote communities, coupled with methodological complexities inherent in the store-turnover method, challenge its application in a contemporary context. Implications: A simplified version of the store-turnover method is needed that could be widely applied by community people and health practitioners seeking to initiate and monitor interventions to improve diet quality.

    AB - Objective: To consider the application of the store-turnover method as a guide to assess food intake in remote Aboriginal communities. Method: Food sources in a remote Aboriginal island community were documented. The contribution of quantifiable food sources to total community-level fresh fruit and vegetable availability was determined. Results: The store remains the single largest supplier of fruit and vegetables overall (54%), however its contribution varies depending on the subpopulation of interest. A store-turnover alone may significantly underestimate community-level dietary intake, depending on the contribution of other food sources. Conclusions: Changes in the food supply in remote communities, coupled with methodological complexities inherent in the store-turnover method, challenge its application in a contemporary context. Implications: A simplified version of the store-turnover method is needed that could be widely applied by community people and health practitioners seeking to initiate and monitor interventions to improve diet quality.

    KW - Aborigine

    KW - analytic method

    KW - article

    KW - catering service

    KW - community care

    KW - food availability

    KW - food intake

    KW - food quality

    KW - fruit

    KW - health practitioner

    KW - human

    KW - nutritional assessment

    KW - vegetable

    KW - Eating

    KW - Food Industry

    KW - Food Supply

    KW - Fruit

    KW - Humans

    KW - Medically Underserved Area

    KW - Northern Territory

    KW - Oceanic Ancestry Group

    KW - Residence Characteristics

    KW - Vegetables

    M3 - Article

    VL - 30

    SP - 444

    EP - 447

    JO - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

    JF - Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health

    SN - 1326-0200

    IS - 5

    ER -