Domestic violence, coercive control and mental health in a pandemic: Disenthralling the ecology of the domestic

Toni McCallum, Judy Rose

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Domestic and family violence is a social and public health issue typically positioned in policy frameworks as a consequence of gendered social and economic structures. In this paper, we deploy an approach that draws on Hörl’s neo-ecological thinking to propose that the home, as a site of domestic violence, can be usefully framed as an ecology of the domestic, a posthumanist hybrid matrix of bodies, spaces and objects in which various practices enact the smooth running of the domestic together with practices of domestic and family violence, including coercive control. Our interest is in coercive control and in the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic had on practices which enact this aspect of domestic violence. Our exploration of the practices that enact coercive control draws on the work of Law and others. We examine how practices, which are not compatible, or that do not cohere, are able to coexist in a domestic ecology and what occurs when there is a disruption as occurred with the pandemic.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)260-274
Number of pages15
JournalHealth Sociology Review
Volume30
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2021

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