Ecological rehabilitation in mangrove systems: The evolution of the practice and the need for strategic reform of policy and planning

Ben Brown

    Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

    Abstract

    Mangrove forest ecosystems covered 13.8 million ha of tropical shorelines in 2000 (Giri et al. 2011), down from 19.8 million ha in 1980 and 15.9 million ha in 1990 (FAO 2003). These losses represent about 2 per cent per year from 1980 to 1990 and 1 per cent per year from 1990 to 2000. Therefore, achieving no net loss of mangroves worldwide would require the successful restoration of approximately 150,000 ha per year, unless all major losses of mangroves ceased. Increasing the total area of mangroves worldwide towards their original extent would require an even larger effort (Lewis in Bozzano et al. 2014).
    Original languageEnglish
    Title of host publicationRoutledge Handbook of Ecological and Environmental Restoration
    EditorsStuart Allison, Stephen Murphy
    PublisherTaylor & Francis
    Chapter20
    Pages295-311
    Number of pages17
    ISBN (Electronic)9781317413752
    ISBN (Print)9781138922129
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 18 May 2017

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  • Cite this

    Brown, B. (2017). Ecological rehabilitation in mangrove systems: The evolution of the practice and the need for strategic reform of policy and planning. In S. Allison, & S. Murphy (Eds.), Routledge Handbook of Ecological and Environmental Restoration (pp. 295-311). Taylor & Francis. https://doi.org/10.4324/9781315685977