Economics of camel control in central Australia

Adam Drucker, Glenn P Edwards, William K Saalfeld

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    A cost-effectiveness analysis based on a bioeconomic model was carried out with regard to specific feral camel control strategies in central Australia.

    Two different aerial control strategies were modelled for the period 200920. Strategy 1 involved annual removals, whereas strategy 2 involved periodic removals only when a specific feral camel density was reached. The direct benefits to the pastoral industry of feral camel control were also modelled in terms of reduced grazing competition together with infrastructure damage. A single environmental service related to reducing greenhouse gas emissions was further considered.

    Although the present costs of control under the two strategies are considerable ($4.104.95million over 12 years at a 5% discount rate), they are far outweighed by the present benefits to the livestock industry from reduced competition ($46.3million), as well as to society as a whole through reduced greenhouse gas emissions ($32.1million). Including reduced infrastructure damage, the net present value of control is $75.2million under strategy 1 and $73.3million under strategy 2 (over 12 years at a 5% discount rate), suggesting that a control strategy based on annual removals should be preferred over a strategy of periodic removals. Given the large positive net present value of control and the robustness of the overall findings, there would appear to be a strong argument for considering the implementation of a full-scale, long-term feral camel control programme in the near future.
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)117-127
    Number of pages11
    JournalRangeland Journal
    Volume32
    Issue number1
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 23 Mar 2010

    Fingerprint

    camels
    economics
    discount rate
    greenhouse gas emissions
    infrastructure
    greenhouse gas
    bioeconomic models
    damage
    cost analysis
    livestock and meat industry
    industry
    cost effectiveness
    ecosystem services
    livestock
    grazing
    removal
    cost

    Cite this

    Drucker, A., Edwards, G. P., & Saalfeld, W. K. (2010). Economics of camel control in central Australia. Rangeland Journal, 32(1), 117-127. https://doi.org/10.1071/RJ09046
    Drucker, Adam ; Edwards, Glenn P ; Saalfeld, William K. / Economics of camel control in central Australia. In: Rangeland Journal. 2010 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 117-127.
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    Drucker, A, Edwards, GP & Saalfeld, WK 2010, 'Economics of camel control in central Australia', Rangeland Journal, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 117-127. https://doi.org/10.1071/RJ09046

    Economics of camel control in central Australia. / Drucker, Adam; Edwards, Glenn P; Saalfeld, William K.

    In: Rangeland Journal, Vol. 32, No. 1, 23.03.2010, p. 117-127.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    Drucker A, Edwards GP, Saalfeld WK. Economics of camel control in central Australia. Rangeland Journal. 2010 Mar 23;32(1):117-127. https://doi.org/10.1071/RJ09046