Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in an Australian population

A case-control study

Parveen Fathima, Thomas L. Snelling, Robyn A. Gibbs

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

    Abstract

    Objective: Two rotavirus vaccines (RV1 and RV5) were included in the publicly funded National Immunisation Program in Australia from July 2007. The programme in Western Australia initially provided RV1 (at ages 2 and 4 months) and then switched to RV5 (at ages 2, 4 and 6 months) from July 2009. This retrospective case-control study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine against laboratory confirmed and notified cases of rotavirus infection among children aged <5 years.

    Methods: Case-subjects were identified as vaccine-eligible children (born from 1 May 2007) who were notified as having rotavirus infection during the period 2009–2011. The control group was vaccine-eligible children notified as having Campylobacter or Salmonella infection during the same period. Individual rotavirus immunisation status was ascertained from a population-based immunisation register. Full-dose and partial-dose vaccine effectiveness (VE) were calculated for both vaccines using the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of vaccination for cases versus controls (VE = (1 − OR)*100%).

    Results: Overall, 282 cases and 883 controls were included. The adjusted VE for a full course of either rotavirus vaccine was 72% (95% CI: 56–82) and 71% (95% CI: 50–84) for partial vaccination (one dose of RV1 or one/two doses of RV5). The VE for a complete 3-dose course of RV5 was 82% (95% CI: 59–92) and for a full 2-dose course of RV1 was 73% (95% CI: 55–83).

    Conclusions: RV1 and RV5 were both effective in preventing laboratory confirmed and notified rotavirus infections among children aged <5 years. Even incomplete courses of vaccination conferred good protection.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)6048-6053
    Number of pages6
    JournalVaccine
    Volume37
    Issue number41
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 24 Sep 2019

    Fingerprint

    Rotavirus Vaccines
    Rotavirus
    case-control studies
    Case-Control Studies
    Vaccines
    vaccines
    Rotavirus Infections
    Population
    Vaccination
    dosage
    immunization
    Immunization
    vaccination
    Odds Ratio
    Campylobacter Infections
    odds ratio
    Immunization Programs
    Western Australia
    Salmonella Infections
    infection

    Cite this

    Fathima, Parveen ; Snelling, Thomas L. ; Gibbs, Robyn A. / Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in an Australian population : A case-control study. In: Vaccine. 2019 ; Vol. 37, No. 41. pp. 6048-6053.
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    title = "Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in an Australian population: A case-control study",
    abstract = "Objective: Two rotavirus vaccines (RV1 and RV5) were included in the publicly funded National Immunisation Program in Australia from July 2007. The programme in Western Australia initially provided RV1 (at ages 2 and 4 months) and then switched to RV5 (at ages 2, 4 and 6 months) from July 2009. This retrospective case-control study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine against laboratory confirmed and notified cases of rotavirus infection among children aged <5 years. Methods: Case-subjects were identified as vaccine-eligible children (born from 1 May 2007) who were notified as having rotavirus infection during the period 2009–2011. The control group was vaccine-eligible children notified as having Campylobacter or Salmonella infection during the same period. Individual rotavirus immunisation status was ascertained from a population-based immunisation register. Full-dose and partial-dose vaccine effectiveness (VE) were calculated for both vaccines using the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of vaccination for cases versus controls (VE = (1 − OR)*100{\%}). Results: Overall, 282 cases and 883 controls were included. The adjusted VE for a full course of either rotavirus vaccine was 72{\%} (95{\%} CI: 56–82) and 71{\%} (95{\%} CI: 50–84) for partial vaccination (one dose of RV1 or one/two doses of RV5). The VE for a complete 3-dose course of RV5 was 82{\%} (95{\%} CI: 59–92) and for a full 2-dose course of RV1 was 73{\%} (95{\%} CI: 55–83). Conclusions: RV1 and RV5 were both effective in preventing laboratory confirmed and notified rotavirus infections among children aged <5 years. Even incomplete courses of vaccination conferred good protection.",
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    Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in an Australian population : A case-control study. / Fathima, Parveen; Snelling, Thomas L.; Gibbs, Robyn A.

    In: Vaccine, Vol. 37, No. 41, 24.09.2019, p. 6048-6053.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleResearchpeer-review

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    T1 - Effectiveness of rotavirus vaccines in an Australian population

    T2 - A case-control study

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    AU - Snelling, Thomas L.

    AU - Gibbs, Robyn A.

    PY - 2019/9/24

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    N2 - Objective: Two rotavirus vaccines (RV1 and RV5) were included in the publicly funded National Immunisation Program in Australia from July 2007. The programme in Western Australia initially provided RV1 (at ages 2 and 4 months) and then switched to RV5 (at ages 2, 4 and 6 months) from July 2009. This retrospective case-control study was conducted to assess the effectiveness of rotavirus vaccine against laboratory confirmed and notified cases of rotavirus infection among children aged <5 years. Methods: Case-subjects were identified as vaccine-eligible children (born from 1 May 2007) who were notified as having rotavirus infection during the period 2009–2011. The control group was vaccine-eligible children notified as having Campylobacter or Salmonella infection during the same period. Individual rotavirus immunisation status was ascertained from a population-based immunisation register. Full-dose and partial-dose vaccine effectiveness (VE) were calculated for both vaccines using the adjusted odds ratio (OR) of vaccination for cases versus controls (VE = (1 − OR)*100%). Results: Overall, 282 cases and 883 controls were included. The adjusted VE for a full course of either rotavirus vaccine was 72% (95% CI: 56–82) and 71% (95% CI: 50–84) for partial vaccination (one dose of RV1 or one/two doses of RV5). The VE for a complete 3-dose course of RV5 was 82% (95% CI: 59–92) and for a full 2-dose course of RV1 was 73% (95% CI: 55–83). Conclusions: RV1 and RV5 were both effective in preventing laboratory confirmed and notified rotavirus infections among children aged <5 years. Even incomplete courses of vaccination conferred good protection.

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