Effects of blood flow restriction and exercise intensity on aerobic, anaerobic, and muscle strength adaptations in physically active collegiate women

Sadegh Amani-Shalamzari, Saeedeh Rajabi, Hamid Rajabi, Daniel E. Gahreman, Carl Paton, Mahdi Bayati, Thomas Rosemann, Pantelis Theodoros Nikolaidis, Beat Knechtle

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Abstract

The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of different combinations of blood flow restriction (BFR) pressure and exercise intensity on aerobic, anaerobic, and muscle strength adaptations in physically active collegiate women. Thirty-two women (age 22.8 ± 2.9 years; body mass index 22.3 ± 2.7 kg/m2) were randomly assigned into four experimental training groups: (a) increasing BFR pressure with constant exercise intensity (IP-CE), (b) constant partial BFR pressure with increasing exercise intensity (CPp-IE), (c) constant complete BFR pressure with increasing exercise intensity (CPC-IE), and (d) increasing BFR pressure with increasing exercise intensity (IP-IE). The participants completed 12 training sessions comprised of repeated bouts of 2 min running on a treadmill with BFR interspersed by 1-min recovery without BFR. Participants completed a series of tests to assess muscle strength, aerobic, and anaerobic performances. Muscle strength, anaerobic power, and aerobic parameters including maximum oxygen consumption (VO2max), time to fatigue (TTF), velocity at VO2max (vVO2max), and running economy (RE) improved in all groups (p ≤ 0.01). The CPC-IE group outscored the other groups in muscle strength RE, and TTF (p < 0.05). In summary, participants with complete occlusion experienced the greatest improvements in muscle strength, aerobic, and anaerobic parameters possibly due to increased oxygen deficiency and higher metabolic stress.

Original languageEnglish
Article number810
Pages (from-to)1-9
Number of pages9
JournalFrontiers in Physiology
Volume10
Issue numberJune
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 26 Jun 2019

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