Effects of dual-task training with blood flow restriction on cognitive functions, muscle quality, and circulatory biomarkers in elderly women

Amir Kargaran, Atefeh Abedinpour, Zohreh Saadatmehr, Rasoul Yaali, Sadegh Amani-Shalamzari, Daniel Gahreman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study investigated the effects of an eight-week dual-task training with and without blood flow restriction (BFR) on muscle quality (MQ) biomarkers, physical and cognitive functions in older women. Twenty-four healthy volunteers (62.9 ± 3.1years) were randomly assigned into either dual-task (DT), DT with blood flow restriction (DTBFR), or control (C) group. The experimental groups performed cognitive tasks while walked on a treadmill at 45% of heart rate reserve (HRR), 20 min per session, three sessions per week for eight weeks. The cuff pressure for the DTBFR group was 50% of the calculated arterial blood occlusion and was increased by 10% every 2 weeks. Pre and post-training intervention, biomarkers of MQ and cognitive functions, body composition, maximal strength, and psychological status were measured. There was a significant interaction effect on BDNF, CAF, P3NP, body mass, BMI, fat percentage, visceral fat mass, and total fat mass (p<0.05). Furthermore, a significant interaction effect on knee extension, 30-s stand-up test, 6-min walk test, timed up&go test, and QOL was observed. There was a significant effect of time on MMSE, sleep quality, and mood score. These findings suggested that including BFR to DT training result in greater physiological and psychological responses and should be considered a training method to combat undesired changes associated with increasing age.

Original languageEnglish
Article number113500
JournalPhysiology and Behavior
Volume239
Early online date24 Jun 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 24 Jun 2021

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